Posts Tagged ‘Vitamin E’

Vitamins and Supplements for Healing

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

Zinc: Zinc works with vitamin A and vitamin C to produce collagen. It also boosts the immune system and stabilizes cell membranes, which aids in healing. Zinc is needed for DNA replication, cell division, cell activation and many more processes that are necessary for healing to occur. People with proper levels of zinc in their bodies have a much higher resistance to infection and a shorter healing time than those with even slight zinc deficiencies.

Vitamin E: Vitamin E improves heart function and helps to limit tissue damage during infection, injury, illness or surgery. Therefore, it is often recommended that supplementation with vitamin E be initiated before a planned surgery, unless you’ve had bleeding issues or a stroke. It can also be helpful after surgery, injury, infection or illness because during these events, oxygen rich blood is temporarily shut off from the damage site. When oxygen is restored to the damaged area, a flood of free radicals and toxins infest the area. Antioxidants such as vitamin E mop up these free radicals and prevent further damage from occurring.

Vitamin A: Vitamin A is necessary for cells to be able to “grow up” and mature. This is very important for tissues to completely heal. Vitamin A works with vitamin C and zinc to produce new tissues and collagen. Vitamin A also aids in creating new blood vessels to nourish newly formed tissues.

Vitamin C: Trauma, surgery, illness, and infection all quickly deplete your vitamin C stores. You may become deficient almost immediately. Vitamin C is a necessary nutrient for the production of collagen and elastin, which are necessary for healing to occur. Collagen makes up the structure of tissues, skin, bones, and blood vessels. Elastin gives the sites the flexibility that they need to withstand swelling, stretching, or future trauma. Vitamin C strengthens the immune system, gives each cell a protective barrier against free radicals, removes damaging free radicals from the body, and helps to prevent and control inflammation. Your doctor may recommend that you supplement with a non-acidic form of vitamin c, like sodium ascorbate vitamin c powder, before and after surgery.

Protein: Generating new tissues requires a lot of protein. Normal protein levels facilitate the formation of fibrous tissues. If there is not enough protein available to properly heal a wound, the body will produce fluid to protect the area while it heals. This leaves people more prone to infections, tissue breakdown and other post-operative complications.

Fiber: Urinary tract and bladder infections are very common after surgery. This is generally because the use of urinary catheters leaves this area open to infection. However, these types of infections can also occur when patients do not drink enough fluids after surgery. While the body is healing, its fluid requirements will be higher. If a high volume of fluid isn’t present, then toxins and bacteria can sit in the bladder too long.

Fiber keeps the bowels moving. This also helps to prevent dehydration and flushes the bladder out regularly. Fiber also helps to strengthen the immune system and reduces inflammation. If infection does occur, fiber can help you to recover faster.

Always remember to discuss any vitamins and supplements that you are taking, or plan to take, with your physician.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Reprinting: This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Sources:

http://www.healthy-vitamin-choice.com/supplements-for-surgery.html
http://inhumanexperiment.blogspot.com/2009/08/protein-vitamins-and-wound-healing.html
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100302171531.htm
http://www.ajcn.org/content/68/2/447S.full.pdf

Part 2: Fat Soluble Vitamins

Friday, August 20th, 2010

Vitamin E is a fat soluble antioxidant. It helps to remove free radicals from the body and protects cells from the damaging effects of oxidation. It also aids in protecting vitamin C, vitamin A, and essential fatty acids from destruction in the body. Vitamin E deficiency is rare, especially in the US where vegetable oil is commonly consumed. Other food sources of vitamin E include seeds, nuts, nut oils, green leafy vegetables, tomatoes, canola oil, and broccoli.

Vitamin E studies suggest that it protects neurons in the brain from damage, especially after a stroke. It has also been shown to reduce cholesterol levels. However, patients taking blood thinners or statin cholesterol medications should not increase their intake of vitamin E, unless advised to do so by a physician. Vitamin E can interfere with these medications because it is a natural anti-coagulant.

Vitamin K aids in blood coagulation, calcium absorption and calcium bonding. It is used as an osteoporosis treatment in Japan, but the long-term effects are still unknown. Studies have shown that vitamin K can actually inhibit nerve cell death caused by oxidative stress, so further studies are being conducted to determine if vitamin K would be beneficial in treating neurological diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease. Studies have also revealed benefits in protecting people from developing liver and prostate cancers. Vitamin K is currently used topically to treat bruises, rosacea, dark circles under the eyes, and spider veins.

Vitamin K is found in leafy green vegetables, such as spinach, and some fruits, such as kiwi and avocado. It is relatively easy to get vitamin K from these sources, if they are consumed in conjunction with fats. Fats allow the intestines to absorb vitamin K, but good flora bacteria are also necessary for absorption.

Like vitamin E, vitamin K can also interfere with the actions of blood thinners and statin medications. Signs of deficiency include anemia, bruising, heavy menstrual bleeding, bleeding gums, or bleeding nose.

Therefore, vitamin K deficiency is mainly seen in people that have been on antibiotics, have recently had a virus or infection that affected the intestine, people who have been on long-term aspirin therapy, and people who have had intestinal surgery.

Remember to ask your doctor about supplementing with vitamins before you start to avoid drug interactions. If you do take vitamins and supplements, you can buy vitamins, wholesale vitamins, or discount vitamins online to reduce the cost of supplementing.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with discount vitamins and the best vitamin C since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality, low-cost wholesale vitamins today!

Part 1: Fat Soluble Vitamins

Wednesday, August 18th, 2010

Vitamins can be divided into two groups; water soluble and fat soluble. Water soluble vitamins make up 9 of the 13 vitamins used by humans. Water soluble vitamins (B complex and vitamin C) dissolve readily in water and are easily excreted from the body. They are not stored by the body and should be consumed daily. Fat soluble vitamins are absorbed in the intestinal tract with the aid of fats or lipids. These vitamins are stored by the body when they are not used, so daily consumption is not necessary.

Vitamins A, D, E and K make up the fat soluble vitamin group. These vitamins are not easily destroyed by food preparation, cooking, or storage like water soluble vitamins. Because of this and the fact that the body stores excesses in the liver and fatty tissues of the body, deficiencies are rare in the US.

Vitamin A is a nutrient necessary for proper bone, eye and tooth development. It is also responsible for many other bodily processes, including night vision and keeping the mucous membranes in the lungs, sinuses, mouth, nose and throat moist. Vitamin A is found mainly in fish, liver and dairy products. Deficiency can cause night blindness, blindness, and severely dry eyes and skin.

The human body can convert beta-carotene into vitamin A. So, other sources for getting your vitamin A include yellow and orange fruits, like mangoes and apricots. Vegetable sources include carrots, pumpkins, and dark green leafy vegetables. Because toxicity is more of a concern than deficiency, many dieticians recommend getting vitamin A from beta-carotene sources. You can check the label of your multi-vitamin to see if the vitamin A is in the form of beta-carotene.

If too much beta-carotene is stored in the liver, it can prevent the liver from storing other fat soluble vitamins. Also, once it is stored there, it cannot be converted into vitamin A. Therefore, you should be careful about how much you take if you are supplementing. Always work with your doctor when you’re on a vitamins and supplements regimen.

Vitamin D is necessary for the body to absorb and use calcium. Vitamin D is crucial in the development, restructuring, and healing of bones. Vitamin D is usually added to dairy products, but can also be obtained from sun exposure or oily fish, like cod, salmon and sardines.

Deficiency is more common with vitamin D than any of the other fat soluble vitamins. Our need for vitamin D increases as we age and our absorption of it decreases. Many people have trouble absorbing it or have difficulty maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D, so they are advised by their physician to take it in the form of vitamin D-3 instead. This is the form of vitamin D that is normally produced in the skin with sun exposure.

Insufficient levels of vitamin D have been associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease, high blood pressure, depression, and even cancer. When you visit your doctor, have them test your vitamin D levels and advise you on whether or not you should supplement.

Part 2 in the series “Fat Soluble Vitamins” will review the vitamins E and K. Remember to ask your doctor about supplementing with vitamins before you start to avoid drug interactions. If you do take vitamins and supplements, you can buy vitamins, wholesale vitamins, or discount vitamins online to reduce the cost of supplementing.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with discount vitamins and the best vitamin C since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality, low-cost wholesale vitamins today!

The “EBC’s” of Managing Stress

Sunday, July 12th, 2009

Taking vitamins is an effective method of stress management. Your body needs to have adequate amounts of certain vitamins stored up to use in regulating stress hormones and neurological responses. Your body quickly uses up vitamins when it is under stress, and even people who get a lot of vitamins from food may still need to supplement. Certain vitamins help to alleviate and prevent the symptoms of stress including fatigue, anxiety, depression and short temper, while protecting your brain and organs from damage and disease that occurs as a result of prolonged stress.

Vitamin E, vitamin B and vitamin C are used in combination with each other to effectively combat stress. This specific combination protects and repairs nerves in the brain and organs while removing excess free radicals that can cause oxidative stress and cause nerve damage. The immune system is also boosted so that it can be ready to handle what life may throw at it.

Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant that combats oxidative stress. It also is a great anti-inflammatory and boosts immunity. These properties make vitamin E one of the best defense mechanisms against heart disease that we have. Stress plays a huge role in contributing to the onset of heart disease, as well as speeding up the progression of heart disease and other diseases. An immune system supported by vitamin E is ready to fight illness and disease is also prepared for spikes in stress. Without enough vitamin E, stress can quickly trigger depression or make it worse. Vitamin E also protects neurons from damage, helps prevent cancer and reduces cholesterol, all problems worsened by cortisol production and oxidative stress.

Vitamin E works best in conjunction with vitamin C. In times of stress, vitamin E can quickly become depleted. Vitamin C slows down that process and helps clear out the free radicals that are trying to flush out the vitamin E. In addition, Vitamin C also fights the physical and neurological effects of stress. Vitamin C helps to regulate the release of the stress hormone cortisol. People with high cortisol levels have higher blood pressure and have trouble recovering from stressful situations.

An imbalance or deficiency in B vitamins can manifest itself behaviorally and physically, causing a lot of undue stress. Neurological symptoms include short attention span, confusion, short-term memory loss, depression and agitated state. Taking the right B vitamins helps to protect the nerves in the brain from damage caused by prolonged or repeated exposure to cortisol and free radicals.

It is important to note that an imbalance of B vitamins can occur naturally or as a result of taking too much of one B vitamin and not enough of another. For this reason, a B complex vitamin is usually recommended.

Combining vitamin E, C and B vitamins gives you an edge on controlling your response to stress while protecting yourself from long-term damage caused by oxidative stress or cortisol production.

Treating stress naturally is a good alternative to prescription drugs. The right combination of vitamins can protect you from damaging free radicals and overproduction of stress hormones. When you buy vitamins, you are helping your body to get what it needs to combat the everyday challenges that we face. Protect yourself from illness and disease by choosing the natural method of treatment and prevention.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health. For more information about C-Salts, otherwise known as the best Vitamin C, or about other Vitamin C powder products, visit http://www.nutri.com where you can buy Vitamins and Supplements of the highest quality.