Posts Tagged ‘vitamin c spine’

Part 3: Vitamin C Deficiency and Spinal Disc Herniation

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

In Parts 1 and 2 of this series, we discussed how vitamin C can control inflammation, reduce back pain, repair and maintain the discs of the spine, and protect bones from losing calcium. Linking back pain to osteoporosis is an interesting concept and can help many back pain sufferers aware of their increased risk of osteoporosis.

Robert P. Heaney, MD, Professor at John Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, is an expert in bone health and osteoporosis. After studying the physiology of bone health for over 50 years, he believes that “If you don’t have enough vitamin C, you don’t make bones right. Collagen is the principal protein of bones, accounting for nearly half of the volume. What the collagen does is prevent bones from coming apart. There is good biology behind it.”

Knowing what we know about vitamin C and its role in the production, repair and protection of our connective tissues it makes sense. Our bodies have to make collagen and elastin to repair and rebuild our muscles, bones, ligaments, and other tissues of the body. Humans do not make their own vitamin C, which is necessary for the production of collagen and elastin, so we must get it in our diets or through supplementation. If we don’t get enough to repair our bodies and protect them from the dangers of inflammation, then we will see them slowly break down on many levels.

James Greenwood, Clinical Professor of Neurosurgery at Baylor University’s College of Medicine, did a study on the use of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) to treat his five hundred patients with spinal disc problems and back pain. He gave them each 250mg of vitamin C four times per day and the patients reported “considerable relief”. Greenwood said that “a significant percentage (of patients in the study) with early disk lesions were able to avoid surgery,” and “the number of reoperations on the same patient for recurrence at the same level or a new disk lesion at a different level was greatly reduced.”

Ascorbic acid in the form of a buffered vitamin c powder is considered to be the best vitamin C on the market today by the most highly respected experts in the medical field. This highly absorbable and potent powder is buffered so there is virtually no acidity to cause stomach upset or aggravate stomach ulcers. As always, speak with your physician or neurosurgeon about using buffered vitamin C powder to treat your back pain, osteoporosis, or spinal injury before starting a vitamins and supplements routine.
 
About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

http://www.cforyourself.com/Conditions/Back_Health/back_health.html
http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/back-pain-osteoporosis-bone-fractures
http://www.beverageinstitute.org/webinar-beverages-and-bone-health-cpe.htm

Part 2: Vitamin C Deficiency and Spinal Disc Herniation

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Here we will discuss how vitamin C can help you to heal your back as well as the surprising link between back problems and osteoporosis.

Healing – Disc lesions and torn muscles in the back can cause a lot of pain. Aside from keeping these things from happening in the first place, vitamin C can help to repair discs and muscles after they are damaged. Injury causes inflammation and pain so that your body knows to use its immune system to heal it. This inflammation causes a cascade of oxidized molecules to form, which is often referred to as oxidative stress or toxic overload.

These free radical toxins travel around the body causing pain and attaching themselves to healthy cells, causing them to weaken as well. Vitamin C latches on to free radicals and creates a barrier around healthy cells to help them fight off these invaders. Then, the diuretic properties of the vitamin C help the body to flush out dangerous toxins and relieve inflammation.

Inflammation does more than cause pain and discomfort. It also increases the body’s demand for calcium. Therefore, inflammation pulls calcium from bones, causing them to weaken and lose mass, resulting in osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis – Spinal compression fractures can cause extreme back pain and are common in people that are in the early or advanced stages of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis literally means “porous bone”. Bones are continually restructuring themselves, taking away damaged areas and rebuilding new bone. Vitamin C is used in creating all of the connective tissues of the body, including the bones. Supplementing with calcium and magnesium is not enough. If there is not enough vitamin C present, the body cannot produce collagen, which is the fibrous protein part of the bone.

Vitamin C is a valuable weapon that can be used against developing osteoporosis. Compression fractures are very common and often go undiagnosed. They can feel like “normal back pain” to many people and they dismiss the pain as a normal part of aging. However, these spinal compressions are very dangerous. The crushing bone puts added stress on vertebral discs and can cause discs to herniate. Bones can become so brittle that a cough or sneeze can cause multiple compression fractures. These fractures cause bone fragments and discs to bulge and put pressure on the nerves of the spinal column. Many people with osteoporosis end up disabled and or living with crippling pain for the rest of their lives.

Use the best vitamin C, such as a buffered vitamin c powder, to help heal your discs, bones, and muscles. In Part 3 of this series, we will discuss how important vitamin C is in preventing and treating osteoporosis.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

http://www.cforyourself.com/Conditions/Back_Health/back_health.html
http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/back-pain-osteoporosis-bone-fractures
http://www.beverageinstitute.org/webinar-beverages-and-bone-health-cpe.htm

Part 1: Vitamin C Deficiency and Spinal Disc Herniation

Sunday, May 15th, 2011

There are strong links between all kinds of back problems and vitamin C deficiency. Muscles, bones, and discs are all affected by low vitamin C levels. Inflammation causes an increased need for calcium, so your body pulls it from your bones. Discs, especially in the lower back, use a lot of vitamin C to constantly repair themselves. Without enough, discs become soft, bulge, and eventually collapse. Muscles are torn down through normal wear and tear, but cannot rebuild without enough vitamin C. Most people attribute their back problems to age, but the truth is that we have more control over preventing and rebuilding our backs than we think. Here we will go over how vitamin C can help you to preserve your independence by helping you to take care of your back.

Disc Composition – The discs in your back are made of a tough fibrous membrane that is filled with a soft, cushiony substance. Your discs are situated directly on top of nerves and between the bones of your vertebral column. Imagine that your discs are like jelly donuts. They take a lot of wear and tear because they are at pivotal points in your body. This means that they use more vitamin C than other parts of your body because the outer layers of the disc are in need of constant replacement. If there is not enough vitamin C, then the tough outer layer of the donut begins to break down and soften and cannot be repaired. Eventually the simplest movement can cause the membrane to tear, allowing the “jelly” to come oozing out and sit on top of that nearby nerve. This is how a disc becomes “herniated” and why it is so painful.

Muscle Spasm and Injury – Weak or injured muscles also contribute to possible disc herniations. Many people experience mild to severe back pain caused by chronic muscle spasms or weak back muscles that tear and become easily inflamed. The muscles of the lower back are being constantly used and, if not kept healthy, are generally the first to cause back trouble. Muscles get sore after we use them and that’s not necessarily always a bad thing. Muscles get stronger when you work them by breaking down, inflaming to signal the need for collagen and elastin for repairs, and then building back up again. Every time you do this the muscle builds mass and maintains it’s flexibility. If there is not enough vitamin C in the body, it cannot make collagen and elastin. This is when the body uses cholesterol to repair the muscles instead. Cholesterol creates hard, brittle repairs in muscles and arteries instead of strong, flexible ones, like collagen and elastin do. When your back is repaired by cholesterol, it is only a temporary fix. Making sure that you have plenty of vitamin C in your diet or supplementing with vitamin C will help you to build strong muscles around your spine, protecting your discs from taking on too much pressure.

In Part 2 of this series we will discuss how vitamin C aids in healing and controlling inflammation. The best vitamin C is an easily absorbable, buffered vitamin c powder that is non-acidic and easily tolerated by almost everyone. As always, speak with your physician before you start a vitamins and supplements routine.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

http://www.cforyourself.com/Conditions/Back_Health/back_health.html
http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/back-pain-osteoporosis-bone-fractures
http://www.beverageinstitute.org/webinar-beverages-and-bone-health-cpe.htm