Posts Tagged ‘mono treatment’

The Clinical Impact of Vitamin C: My Personal Experiences as a Physician

Monday, September 8th, 2014

Vitamin C Research

Actual cases of flu, mono, lyme disease and more treated with intravenous vitamin C.

Commentary by Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD

(OMNS Sept 3, 2014) My ongoing relationship with vitamin C now spans a full 20 years, when I first met Dr. Hal Huggins, a pioneering dentist who opened my eyes to a wide array of clinical approaches to different diseases with hitherto unheard-of clinical results at his clinic in Colorado Springs. I can honestly say that my first visit to his clinic began the most meaningful part of my medical education. Nothing has been the same since. My office where I practiced adult cardiology ended up being shuttered shortly after that first visit. And I have never looked back.
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Treating Mononucleosis Naturally

Tuesday, June 29th, 2010

Infectious mononucleosis, otherwise known as mono, is a viral infection that is spread by saliva, through kissing or drinking after someone carrying the virus. Symptoms include a fever of 102-104, swollen glands behind the ears and jaw, sore throat, swollen tonsils, rash, exhaustion, lack of appetite, body aches, and chills. Not everyone experiences the same symptoms. Swollen glands, tiredness, and body aches are the most common.

If you are exposed to mononucleosis and do not have immunity to it, then you could be infections for several days before symptoms appear. Once you get mono, you can be contagious for several months. Most people are able to transmit the disease for around 18 months. In rare cases, mono can be contagious for years.

Your doctor can do a blood test to check for signs of mono. However, sometimes a diagnosis can be made based solely on symptoms. Tonsils will sometimes swell and become ulcerated, showing white patches upon inspection. There are usually tiny red spots on the rear roof of the mouth, resembling pin pricks. A rash resembling measles will sometimes appear.

Your doctor will most likely check you for a swollen spleen or liver. The spleen is on your left side, starting underneath the rib cage and extending about half-way down the torso. If you feel that your spleen is swollen, you should see a doctor immediately. The spleen can burst, which is the biggest risk of death to someone with mono.

Most people will get over the symptoms of mono in 2-4 weeks with adequate rest. Treatment with anti-viral drugs can actually prolong bothersome symptoms. The advice of doctors is to rest as much as possible for 1-2 weeks. Vigorous activity should be avoided for 2-4 months after symptoms have passed, to avoid spleen rupture.

Many people with mono are frustrated that there is no real treatment. The only course of action consists of treating symptoms. Occasionally the tonsils will need to be removed and the rash may be treated with cortisone cream, but there isn’t a magic pill to help you get over mono any faster.

Treating the symptoms of mono generally consists of taking ibuprofen or acetaminophen for pain and inflammation. Corticosteroids may be prescribed to lessen the swelling of the tonsils. Antibiotics are only given if strep throat accompanies the mono. Many people turn to natural vitamins and supplements to encourage speedy healing.

Taking the natural approach is actually a very good way to treat mono. You should get lots of rest and drink lots of fluids. Doctors advise patients to avoid food additives, like sugar and preservatives, along with highly processed foods. Lots of fruits and vegetables high in antioxidants are encouraged. Caffeine, alcohol and tobacco products must be avoided.

Antioxidant vitamins, like vitamin C, are great for boosting your immune system into high gear. It is taxing on the immune system to create the antibodies against mono. Vitamin C helps to clear your cells of the virus and give your immune system the tools to perform at its peak. Omega-3 supplements taken along with vitamin C have been shown to improve the inflammation of the lymph nodes, liver and the spleen in mono patients.

Talk with your doctor before you begin a vitamins and supplements routine. You can buy discount vitamins and wholesale supplements online if you wish to save money while treating the symptoms of mononucleosis.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people maintain good health with wholesale vitamins and supplements. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best discount vitamins and wholesale supplements since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality, low-cost discount supplements today!