Posts Tagged ‘diabetes’

Substituting Vitamins and Supplements for Pharmaceuticals in Type 2 Diabetes

Monday, June 4th, 2012

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Here at Wholesale Nutrition, we highly value valid research related to vitamins and supplements. We are continually impressed with the reports from Orthomolecular Medicine News Service and would like to share some of their content with you from time to time. We hope you find it as fascinating as we do!

Commentary by Stuart Lindsey, PharmD
(OMNS May 28, 2012) Just when you thought it was safe to go back into the drugstore, we are going to question authority yet again. Readers may remember Dr. Stuart Lindsey as the Frustrated Pharmacist (http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v08n05.shtml). He’s back and at it once more, this time presenting an important supplement-based approach to type 2 diabetes. This essay presents ideas that are very possibly a large part of the solution. As with all OMNS releases, it is not meant to substitute for medical advice. Persons should consult their own doctor before making any health decision. – Andrew W. Saul, Editor

The current treatment of diabetes is among the least successful in medicine, despite billions of dollars spent on research. Many scientists make a career of studying diabetes. Medicine has succeeded in making diabetes very expensive for the patient while making the disease a cash cow for the numerous businesses that cater to the diabetic. We should expect to see some improvement in diabetic treatment, but in fact the basic protocols haven’t changed much in twenty years. Is research getting close to a solution? In my opinion as a practicing pharmacist, the answer is no.

For fifteen years I was the pharmacy manager for an independent neighborhood drug store. I saw the results of many people over the long term as they were introduced to the “sugar-med treadmill.” After prolonged consumption of their diabetic medications, their health did not improve. This was disturbing to me. The long term diabetics all seemed to have the same group of symptoms: they were overweight (due to hyper-insulinemia), edematous (having swelling under the skin), and they all suffered from poor exercise tolerance and had a generally unhealthy appearance. Many of them had peripheral neuropathy (malfunction of nerves), often associated with pain in their hands and feet. Only rarely did they believe their diabetes treatment was actually improving their health.

My interest in the lack of results from standard treatment of diabetes came into sharp focus when pain in my feet led to my being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. From my observations at work, I already knew that the drug treatments for peripheral neuropathy were questionable. Introducing amitriptyline, gabapentin and Lyrica, which are sedatives and pain killers, made the people sleep a lot. Medically, it’s obvious that sedating nerves doesn’t solve anything. When such patients step up to daily long term narcotics and finally get some pain relief, they still haven’t solved their problems.

Current medical practice relies on the HgbA1c (glycated hemoglobin) level as a measure of blood sugar over several months. The glycated hemoglobin is caused by high levels of sugar binding to hemoglobin inside red blood cells. When it builds up, this means that the body’s biochemicals and organs are being damaged by too much sugar. It was interesting to note how many of the diabetic patients were in the normal range (i.e. HgbA1c < 6.5) but were still in agony over their feet. The problem was that seeing a normal value of HgbA1c, the doctor would hesitate to change the treatment. Apparently, severe foot pain wasn't a symptom that needed attention. I decided to explore the whole HgbA1c issue. The biggest argument you see in diabetes is that diabetes is a 'disposal' issue. A high level of blood sugar is a type of metabolic malfunction that needs to be corrected. Blood sugar has a geography problem. The body seems driven to urinate the sugars out of the body instead of jamming the sugars across supposedly malfunctioning membranes and burning the sugars intracellularly. Medical practice can apply insulin and many types of drugs to insure that the body's tissues metabolize the sugars. Most current diabetic research is targeted at 'breaching the barrier' and making the supposedly malfunctioning membranes more permeable to carbohydrates. When those extra sugar calories are crammed into cells you get advanced glycation end-products (AGE's) that are a threat to the body. In 2005, a UK researcher named Paul Thornalley wrote a paper detailing how many diabetic symptoms are due to a deficiency of thiamine (B-1).[1] Elevated blood sugar promotes a type of toxicity in the kidneys that causes thiamine to be excreted by the kidney at a rate much higher (sixteen to twenty-five times higher) than normal, leading to an acute deficiency of thiamine. From other studies, it is known that deficiencies in all B vitamins, as well as vitamin C and D are common in diabetics.[2] This can cause most of the symptoms of type 2 diabetes, which include: polyneuropathy, nephropathy (kidney damage), retinopathy (eye damage) and eventually heart failure. This raises the question of whether the symptoms are from diabetes or acute beriberi? When I was diagnosed with type II diabetes, I immediately balked at taking the standard diabetic drugs. My doctor wanted to place me on statins, metformin and Byetta, all of which I refused to take. Having researched Dr. Thornalley's theory of diabetes being an acute thiamine deficiency, I started a regimen of vitamin and mineral supplements. Although the pain in my feet was quite severe, I wanted to avoid the regular drug regimen because it relied upon taking lots of pain killers that don't cure the problem. I reasoned that when the body's B vitamin levels are depleted due to high blood sugar, replenishing body stores through diet alone is difficult, so supplementation will be necessary. I started taking a dietary supplement of thiamine (benfotiamine, 250mg 4x/day). I also added of vitamin B-6 (250mg/day) and pyridoxal 5 phosphate (P5P, 100mg/day) magnesium (aspartate, citrate, malate, or chloride) and acetyl-l-carnitine (1000 mg/day) depending on the severity of my peripheral neuropathy symptoms. More recently I've learned of the importance of taking vitamin C to reduce inflammation and prevent oxidation from high blood sugar levels.[2] My doctor did not approve of my self-treatment but was curious. I told him that I was willing to go back to the standard of care if this didn't work. "Positive factors for treating type 2 diabetes are magnesium, exercise, weight control, chromium, dietary fiber, the B-vitamins, vitamin E, vanadium, vitamin C, and complex carbohydrates. I have been using the positive factors for the past 40 years. When patients followed such a program, the results are very good." Abram Hoffer, MD, PhD [3] The most overt of the neuropathy symptoms started to subside rapidly. Within a week, the shooting pains in my ankles were mostly gone. All of the other symptoms of numbness of the toes and overall pain of the feet including the "boot effect" (the feeling that you have your boots or socks on) were mostly gone in three weeks. Now I know this treatment may not be a cure for diabetes. But it is a valid and reasonably inexpensive way to control the symptoms, which are held at bay as long as you keep your thiamine levels high. If you quit taking thiamine and the other B vitamins, the symptoms come roaring back. I looked for the inevitable deterioration of my health that had been predicted. Ignore your blood sugar levels at your peril I was told. I was going to have kidney problems, my pancreas would stop cooperating and my vision would become blurry as the elevated sugars damaged my retinas. But the only sign of an active problem was the neuropathies in my feet which were quite painful at times: numbness of my toe area and shooting pains in my foot joints. I also had the feeling that the circulation of my feet was poor as my feet were always cold. After two years I finally got blood tests. I still felt very good having lost some weight, with no vision problems, and my energy level and psychological attitude were all fine.I was actually afraid to look at the results and finding out that I had finally outsmarted myself and got hurt. There is a quite a propaganda machine built around the treatment of diabetes. As I drove over to retrieve my blood tests I did a mental check of how I felt. I decided I couldn't have a lot wrong with me as I just felt too good. My blood tests were amazingly free of problems related to elevated blood sugar, and I had few other related discernible health defects. This thiamine treatment did not change my HgbA1c (which is currently 9.1, and that is high) or my resting blood sugars (fasting blood sugars still between 180-190, and those also are high). Values like these are supposed to indicate a poor quality of health. My recent blood tests indicated: Creatinine, urine 86.7mg/dl. Scale 20-370; low normal. Microalbumin/Creatinine ratio 9.2mg/GCr. Scale 0-30; low normal. Creatinine and microalbumineria values are the so called "Canary in the Coal Mine" indicators. The kidneys are supposed to go first when Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) have started your march to health failure because you didn't keep your HgbA1c values within range. I think my two-plus years is long enough for this to play out. I had my eyes checked for sugar damage to my retinas. I have no sugar damage to my eyes whatsoever. I am 61 years old and have 20-25 vision in both eyes. Jonathan Wright, MD, is among those who have noted that skin tags may be connected to diabetes; interestingly enough the skin tags on my arms have all disappeared. However, my health hasn't failed due to hyperglycemia, although it is still a problem. In my case, the unusual positive results are evidently due to my nutritional approach. I substituted supplements of several essential nutrients for pharmaceuticals and stayed in relatively good health. And I continue to try supplementing with other nutrients such as antioxidants which are known to help prevent diabetes. [2] This suggests that the health issues are actually caused by nutritional deficiencies that can be easily prevented. I am hoping this simple (and non-toxic) experiment on myself will lead the field to discussing the validity of substituting vitamins in diabetes treatment. The treatment of diabetes as it now stands is complicated and expensive. I am spending about $130/month on supplements, and during this two year experiment I have not given my doctor a single dime for advice on how to regulate my HgbA1c value. I imagine I've saved more than twice that amount by avoiding paying for drugs and doctor visits. Is this justified? If my health remains good and I have no other serious problems, I believe it is. If all diabetics would supplement with B vitamins and vitamins C, D, and E, and minerals such as calcium and magnesium, they would lessen their problems with insulin and blood sugar, and the other serious symptoms of diabetes.[2] The reason is that most people in our society, especially including diabetics, have deficiencies of these essential nutrients that are known to be related to diabetes. But this essay is also an attempt to unseat some basic tenets of the medical fiasco known as diabetes. The prevalence in 2011 of type II world-wide according to the World Health Organization (WHO) is 346 million, and some 3.4 million people dies in 2004 as a consequence of the disease. The WHO predicts that the deaths attributable to diabetes will double between 2005 and 2030. [4] With this kind of projection a "Manhattan Project" kind of response seems necessary. So what is the intellectual problem that seems so intractable to the medical research community? The standard treatments to lower blood sugar and HgbA1c were recently tested in medical trials. The ACCORD trials were meant to validate once and for all that the closer a patient got to a HgbA1c level of 6% the healthier a person became. Instead there was 22% increase in mortality from heart failure.[5] This unexpected value caused the FDA to terminate the trial midstream. Is it possible that the HgbA1c value should not be a primary goal in evaluating diabetes treatments? If you go to PubMed and enter the keywords "thiamine deficiency" and "diabetes" you will get dozens of references that describe how many symptoms of diabetes are caused by a thiamine deficiency it generates. Deficiencies of B vitamins and other essential nutrients are important in diabetes.[2] This should be required reading for all doctors who treat or research diabetes. Currently in conventional management of diabetes, supplement based nutrition therapy is utterly neglected. The National Diabetes Fact Sheet reported that in 2007, the direct medical costs of diabetes nationally was estimated at $116 billion (USD). [6] Diabetic patients can feel overwhelmed by a diagnosis of hyperglycemia, but are often comforted by the complicated explanations and sudden increase in activity and attention directed at them. The possibility that they are being misled just doesn't come up. Even if patients decide to do their own research it can be confusing. The cause of diabetes is basically unknown, but they are told that with some major alterations to one's lifestyle and lots of drugs liberally applied they can lead a relatively normal life. However for the truly curious, a large block of mainstream nutrition ideas of which the doctors are mostly ignorant can be freely accessed on the internet. When a patient presents this alternative information to the doctor today, they are comforted and told that they are already getting the cutting edge treatment. But even three years after the revelations of the ACCORD trials there has been no major correction of the type II treatment protocols that addresses the unexplained mortality issues revealed by the trials. Even if my vitamin arguments are only partially correct, the implications for mainstream medicine are staggering. These ideas need wide discussion the field, because patients with diabetes need some new ideas. For further reading: Melvyn R. Werbach's Nutritional Influences on Illness contains a valuable review of research indicating the therapeutic value of supplements, and their specific dosages, for diabetics. Third Line Press, 2nd Edition, 1996 ISBN-10: 0961855053; ISBN-13: 978-0961855055. Endocrinologist and Professor of Medicine (University of Kentucky) J. W. Anderson is perhaps the world's leading researcher on fiber and diabetes. http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_anderson.html As much a book about fiber as it is about overconsumption of sugar, The Saccharine Disease by T. L. Cleave (1975) is available in its entirety for free online at http://www.cybernaut.com.au/optimal_nutrition/information/library/saccharine_disease.pdf and also at http://journeytoforever.org/farm_library/Cleave/cleave_toc.html References: 1. Thornalley PJ: The potential role of thiamine (vitamin B-1) in diabetic complications. Curr Diabetes Rev, 2005; 1:287-298 2. Brighthope IE (2012) The Vitamin Cure for Diabetes: Prevent and Treat Diabetes Using Nutrition and Vitamin Supplementation. Basic Health Publications ISBN-13: 978-1591202905. 3. http://www.doctoryourself.com/diabetes.html 4. World Health Organization. Diabetes. Retrieved from [ http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs312/en/index.html ] 5. Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Study Group, Gerstein HC, Miller ME, Byington RP, et al: Effects of intensive glucose lowering in type II diabetes. N Engl J Med, 2008; 358: 2545-2559. 6. National Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2011. Retrieve from: www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2011.pdf (Much of this article is drawn from Lindsey SL Substituting vitamins and supplements for pharmaceuticals in type 2 diabetes J Orthomolecular Med 2012, 27:1; p 5-8. We thank the Journal for permission to reprint it here in edited form .) Nutritional Medicine is Orthomolecular Medicine Orthomolecular medicine uses safe, effective nutritional therapy to fight illness. For more information: http://www.orthomolecular.org Find a Doctor To locate an orthomolecular physician near you: http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v06n09.shtml The peer-reviewed Orthomolecular Medicine News Service is a non-profit and non-commercial informational resource. Editorial Review Board: Ian Brighthope, M.D. (Australia) Ralph K. Campbell, M.D. (USA) Carolyn Dean, M.D., N.D. (USA) Damien Downing, M.D. (United Kingdom) Dean Elledge, D.D.S., M.S. (USA) Michael Ellis, M.D. (Australia) Martin P. Gallagher, M.D., D.C. (USA) Michael Gonzalez, D.Sc., Ph.D. (Puerto Rico) William B. Grant, Ph.D. (USA) Steve Hickey, Ph.D. (United Kingdom) James A. Jackson, Ph.D. (USA) Michael Janson, M.D. (USA) Robert E. Jenkins, D.C. (USA) Bo H. Jonsson, M.D., Ph.D. (Sweden) Thomas Levy, M.D., J.D. (USA) Stuart Lindsey, Pharm.D. (USA) Jorge R. Miranda-Massari, Pharm.D. (Puerto Rico) Karin Munsterhjelm-Ahumada, M.D. (Finland) Erik Paterson, M.D. (Canada) W. Todd Penberthy, Ph.D. (USA) Gert E. Schuitemaker, Ph.D. (Netherlands) Robert G. Smith, Ph.D. (USA) Jagan Nathan Vamanan, M.D. (India) Andrew W. Saul, Ph.D. (USA), Editor and contact person. Email: [email protected] Readers may write in with their comments and questions for consideration for publication and as topic suggestions. However, OMNS is unable to respond to individual emails. To Subscribe at no charge: http://www.orthomolecular.org/subscribe.html

Is Sugar Toxic?

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

Here at Wholesale Nutrition, we highly value valid research related to vitamins and supplements. We are continually impressed with the reports from Orthomolecular Medicine News Service and would like to share some of their content with you from time to time. We hope you find it as fascinating as we do!

Orthomolecular Medicine News Service, April 24, 2012

Toxic Sugar

Editorial by Robert G. Smith, PhD

(OMNS April 24, 2012) A recent article in the prestigious journal Nature
explains that sugar, especially fructose, widely available in soft
drinks
and other processed foods, is responsible for many serious
non-communicable
diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, obesity, and liver
failure [1,2]. One of the contributing reasons is that fructose and
other
high-calorie substances such as alcohol cannot be directly utilized by
the
body’s tissues so they must be metabolized by the liver, where they
generate
toxicity and set the body on a path to diabetes [3]. Further, fructose
interferes with the body’s sense of satiety, so that an excess of
calories
tend to be ingested. This overwhelms the liver, which then must convert
the
overdose of sugar into fat, which harms the liver and can lead to
diabetes.
Thus sugar such as fructose, when added to processed foods, has been
compared to alcohol in its toxic effect. Even non-obese people are
susceptible to “metabolic syndrome,” in which fructose induces
hypertension,
cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, and damage to biological
molecules such as proteins and lipids [1-3].

Soft drinks that contain mainly sugar, such as sodas and filtered fruit
juices, don’t have enough nutrients to keep the body healthy and free
from
disease. They provide calories without essential nutrients that you
would
find in the whole fruit. These “empty” calories then replace other foods
such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables that are the main source of
essential nutrients. But added sugar is not limited to soft drinks.
Added
fructose, as in high-fructose corn syrup or just plain sugar (sucrose,
which
is 50% glucose and 50% fructose), is found in a wide variety of
processed
foods such as breakfast cereal, juices, jellies and jams, candy, baked
goods, sauces, desserts, and even ready-made dinners and processed meat.
Fructose tastes sweet but does not satisfy hunger as well as more
nutritious
foods.

The high added fructose content of processed foods is addictive in a
similar
way to alcohol, especially for young children. This has caused an
epidemic
of obesity in both children and adults. Further, the metabolism of
fructose
in the liver is similar to alcohol because it tends to perturb glucose
metabolism, generating fat and causing insulin resistance, which leads
to
inflammation and degeneration of the liver and many other problems [4].
Overall, this dietary pattern caused by overloading our bodies with
fructose
is a vicious cycle that leads to widespread deficiencies of nutrients
such
as vitamins and essential minerals, along with damage and inflammation
throughout the body. This vicious cycle of sugar addiction, consistent
with
the “metabolic syndrome,” is in large part responsible for the high
death
rate from the modern diet.

If the modern diet could be adjusted to satisfy hunger without excess
calories and to contain a larger proportion of essential nutrients, the
epidemic of disease from added sugar might be averted. When ingested in
the
form of fruit, fructose is less harmful because it is absorbed slowly by
the
gut and importantly is accompanied by essential nutrients. Supplements
of
essential nutrients can help, but only if knowledge about the adequate
doses
and their benefits is made widely available. Examples are supplements of
vitamin A, B vitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E, magnesium, omega -3 and -6
essential fats, which in the proper forms and doses can help prevent
dietary
deficiencies that cause heart disease, cancer, and diabetes [5]. Other
lifestyle choices can help, for example, reducing total calories,
increasing
ingested fiber, and more exercise [3]. But the benefits of these healthy
choices have not been convincing to the modern consumer. Ubiquitous high
pressure marketing of soft drinks contributes to the problem.

To correct the problem of sugar overconsumption, it has been suggested
that
sugar be regulated like alcohol and tobacco [1]. The goal would be to
change
habits to reduce consumption. Many schools have already banned the sale
of
sodas, but have replaced them with juices or artificial drinks that
contain
added sugar. According to this suggestion, the sale of sweetened drinks
and
processed foods containing added sugar could be limited in school
vending
machines or elsewhere during school hours. Age limits on the sale of
sugary
foods in stores might also help. A limit or ban on television
commercials
advertising products containing added sugar might also be helpful. A tax
on
sugar, especially high-fructose corn syrup, could be used to fund
research
into essential nutrients and advertise their benefits. The idea behind
such
regulation would be to persuade the public, especially children, to
consume
less sugar and more nutritious foods [1,2]. This could greatly benefit
public health.

It has been argued that similar regulation of alcohol is widely accepted
because it has kept alcohol consumption under control [1]. For example,
in
other areas of our lives, changes in what is perceived as acceptable
behavior have been successful, like bans on smoking in public places,
designated drivers who don’t drink alcohol, and the inclusion of air bags
in
cars. To some, a similar type of governmental regulation of sugar would
seem
justified because at the cost of some loss of personal freedom it could
improve health and cut short the epidemic of non-infectious disease.

On the other hand, many people see regulation of sugar by taxing foods
containing added sugar as abhorrent and draconian. After all, although it
is
addictive [4], sugar doesn’t cause the danger of being drunk on the
highway, and it doesn’t present an imminent danger to health comparable to
smoking.
It’s more insidious than that. And sugar has long been part of dietary
habits of many cultures. Thus, any governmental regulation of food will
have
many critics who explain that regulation would be ineffective, and
further,
we should be able to purchase and eat any food according to our
preference.

The underlying issue in this debate is public access to knowledge about
nutrition. If the harm that added fructose causes to our health could be
widely publicized, along with information about inexpensive and readily
available healthy alternatives, this could lead to better health for
millions of people. It would cause shoppers to consider other choices,
such
as vegetable juice or a glass of water, along with unprocessed
nutritious
foods and vitamin supplements in adequate doses. What is needed is a
campaign that provides practical information about diet: what nutrients
we
need, how to determine the proper doses, and the dangers of a
processed-food
diet. This could include televised advertisements and health programming,
as
well as curricula taught at levels from grade school to medical school.
It might also include more informative labeling about the nutrient content of
food, as well as more healthy and tasty food served at restaurants and
dining rooms. Marketplace pressure might then convince food companies to
sell more healthy food with a minimum of added sugar and an adequate
content of essential nutrients. Orthomolecular medicine, the practice of
treating illness by providing sufficient doses of essential nutrients to prevent
deficiencies, can help to provide this information [5-8]. We can all
become more healthy by forgoing added sugar and other processed foods that lack
essential nutrients. And when this is impossible, we can supplement with
these essential nutrients to prevent the epidemic of obesity, cardiovascular
disease, diabetes, and cancer.

(Dr. Robert G. Smith is Research Associate Professor in the Department
of
Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of many
scientific papers, and an upcoming book, The Vitamin Cure for Eye
Diseases.)

References:

1. Lustig RH, Schmidt LA, Brindis CD (2012) The toxic truth about sugar.
Nature 482:27-29.

2. Jacobson MF (2005) Liquid candy: how soft drinks are harming
Americans’
health. Center for Science in the Public Interest.

http://www.cihfimediaservices.org/12all/lt.php?c=180&m=257&nl=3&s=deaf2ee23f
7a662831cf83d81b3e9d8c&lid=1822&l=-http–www.cspinet.org/new/pdf/liquid_cand
y_final_w_new_supplement.pdf.

3. Bremer AA, Mietus-Snyder M, Lustig RH. (2012) Toward a Unifying
Hypothesis of Metabolic Syndrome. Pediatrics. 129:557-570

4. Lustig RH. (2010) Fructose: metabolic, hedonic, and societal
parallels
with ethanol. J Am Diet Assoc. 110:1307-1321.

5. Brighthope IE (2012) The Vitamin Cure for Diabetes: Prevent and Treat
Diabetes Using Nutrition and Vitamin Supplementation. Basic Health
Publications. ISBN-13: 978-1591202905.

6. Roberts H, Hickey S (2011) The Vitamin Cure for Heart Disease: How to
Prevent and Treat Heart Disease Using Nutrition and Vitamin
Supplementation.

Basic Health Publications. ISBN-13: 978-1591202646.

7. Hoffer A, Saul AW (2008) Orthomolecular Medicine For Everyone:
Megavitamin Therapeutics for Families and Physicians. Basic Health
Publications. ISBN13: 9781591202264.

8. Hoffer A, Saul AW, Foster HD (2012) Niacin: The Real Story: Learn
about
the Wonderful Healing Properties of Niacin. Basic Health Publications
ISBN-13: 978-1591202752

Nutritional Medicine is Orthomolecular Medicine
Orthomolecular medicine uses safe, effective nutritional therapy to
fight illness. For more information:

http://www.cihfimediaservices.org/12all/lt.php?c=180&m=257&nl=3&s=deaf2ee23f
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Editorial Review Board:
Ian Brighthope, M.D. (Australia)
Ralph K. Campbell, M.D. (USA)
Carolyn Dean, M.D., N.D. (USA)
Damien Downing, M.D. (United Kingdom)
Dean Elledge, D.D.S., M.S. (USA)
Michael Ellis, M.D. (Australia)
Martin P. Gallagher, M.D., D.C. (USA)
Michael Gonzalez, D.Sc., Ph.D. (Puerto Rico)
William B. Grant, Ph.D. (USA)
Steve Hickey, Ph.D. (United Kingdom)
James A. Jackson, Ph.D. (USA)
Michael Janson, M.D. (USA)
Robert E. Jenkins, D.C. (USA)
Bo H. Jonsson, M.D., Ph.D. (Sweden)
Thomas Levy, M.D., J.D. (USA)
Stuart Lindsey, Pharm.D. (USA)
Jorge R. Miranda-Massari, Pharm.D. (Puerto Rico)
Karin Munsterhjelm-Ahumada, M.D. (Finland)
Erik Paterson, M.D. (Canada)
W. Todd Penberthy, Ph.D. (USA)
Gert E. Schuitemaker, Ph.D. (Netherlands)
Robert G. Smith, Ph.D. (USA)
Jagan Nathan Vamanan, M.D. (India)

Andrew W. Saul, Ph.D. (USA), Editor and contact person. Email:
[email protected] Readers may write in with their comments and
questions for consideration for publication and as topic suggestions.
However, OMNS is unable to respond to individual emails.

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Natural Treatment of Adult Onset Diabetes

Monday, September 28th, 2009

Adult onset diabetes is also known as type 2 diabetes. It is a chronic condition that has life-threatening implications. Warning signs and symptoms include blurred vision, increased urination (volume and frequency), fatigue, excessive thirst and increased appetite. You may also discover dark skin in the creases of your body. Common places are in the folds of the neck and armpits. These are all signs of insulin resistance or that your pancreas has ceased making insulin.

Normally, your body will excrete insulin to clear excess sugar out of your blood so that it can be used as cell fuel. If you develop type 2 diabetes, then your body is no longer able to metabolize sugar. The blood sugar stays high because insulin cannot move it into the cells, where it would normally be used as fuel. The fatigue comes when the cells cannot get the sugar for energy. Your cells then send signals to your brain that you need to eat sugary or starchy foods to give them the fuel that they need to function. So, you become hungry, eat more, sleep more, and make the problem worse.

The number one risk factor for type 2 diabetes is being overweight. Eating a diet high in sugar or starchy foods will cause you to become overweight and put you at higher risk for developing this condition. To understand how sugar leads to diabetes, we turn to the liver.

Normally, you eat fruits, vegetables and proteins. Your body slowly breaks these things down to provide your cells with sugar. So why is eating sugar directly so bad? The answer has to do with the speed in which the sugar hits the bloodstream. Simple sugars and processed foods quickly turn to glucose and fill up the bloodstream. Whenever your body has more fuel than it needs, it stores the excess in the liver.

Your liver becomes filled to capacity and then turns the sugar into fatty acids to clear them out and distribute them around the body. At first, the fat goes where it is supposed to, around the thighs, hips, upper arms and buttocks. When those areas become filled, then the fat goes to your organs instead.

This chain of events can easily and quickly turn into diabetes. It is very hard to control your appetite and cravings for sugar when your body thinks that it needs it so badly. The more times you give in, the bigger you will get, again, making the problem worse.

If you have type 2 diabetes, then your body is under constant stress and continually produces cortisol. Cortisol is a stress hormone that causes even more fat to build up around the organs in an effort to protect them from the free radicals that the disease is creating. Because high levels of sugars cannot react correctly with proteins, free radicals are produced all over your body at an alarming rate. They can quickly cause strokes, cancer, damage nerves and deteriorate blood vessels. It is believed that the free radicals are to blame for many amputations that are necessary after vessels and nerves are damaged.

You need to rid your body of these free radicals and excess cortisol daily. To do this, you will need to supplement your healthy diet with vitamin A, C and E (remember “ACE”). Higher doses of vitamins and supplements are necessary to maintain immunity and clear free radicals in diabetics. Talk to your doctor about your condition before you buy vitamins or buy supplements and start a vitamins and supplements routine.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements. The best vitamins, the best Vitamin C Powder on the market (C-Salts). Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy vitamins or buy supplements of the highest quality.

Reversing Metabolic Syndrome

Saturday, September 12th, 2009

Metabolic syndrome is a combination of health problems that occur at the same time. They increase your risk of death by heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and stroke. Excess insulin, high LDL cholesterol, and visceral (abdominal) fat accumulation alone increase your risk of metabolic syndrome twenty fold.

Metabolic syndrome exhibits itself in a variety of ways. People with any of these symptoms or conditions are at a dramatically increased risk for metabolic syndrome, heart disease, stroke and Type 2 diabetes; high cholesterol (low HDL cholesterol, high LDL cholesterol, high triglyceride levels), inflammatory components in the blood, high blood pressure, large waist circumference, or elevated fasting glucose levels.

Three or more of these conditions can lead to a grim diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. If you do not have metabolic syndrome, but you do have an increased waist circumference combined with a body mass index that is not considered to be in the healthy range, then you are almost guaranteed to develop metabolic syndrome if you do nothing to reduce your abdominal fat. By making a few changes in your life, you can avoid a plethora of life-threatening, disabling diseases.

The first step is to get your cholesterol levels in check. Triglyceride levels are most important and can be controlled through DHA and EPA Omega-3 supplementation. Fish oils and other supplements that get triglyceride levels under control can actually make your cholesterol readings more accurate and help turn harmful triglycerides into less harmful LDL.

LDL cholesterol proteins can harden and stick to arterial walls in your heart and arteries, making damage harder to reverse. Vitamin C actually prevents your LDL cholesterol from oxidizing and becoming “sticky”. Vitamin C combined with soluble fiber helps your liver to function properly and dispose of excess LDL cholesterol. Niacin can help raise HDL cholesterol levels and get them back to where they should be. Vitamins C and E help the cells to use sugar while helping the body properly respond to insulin.

Type 2 diabetes is totally preventable and almost always curable. However, it remains in our nation’s top 10 killer conditions list securely at number 6. This is only measuring deaths caused by Type 2 diabetes. It doesn’t take into account all of the amputations, anxiety, nerve damage, blindness, kidney disease, impotence and infections that it causes. Type 2 diabetes used to be known as “adult onset diabetes” until our children started getting it, too. Type 2 diabetes is caused by the overconsumption of carbohydrates combined with a lack of exercise. Exercise combined with a healthier diet makes blood sugar manageable. There is no way around it, diet and exercise is the only way to get blood sugar levels in check.

If you have metabolic syndrome, cells become damaged and resistant to insulin. Blood sugar gets out of control and the body is depleted of minerals every time you have a soda or eat refined flours or sugars. You must replace the minerals lost to start losing weight and healing your body. Small, high protein meals, six times per day are recommended.

All diabetics and people at risk for metabolic syndrome will constantly flush vitamins and minerals from their bodies. Chromium is the main mineral lost that is needed to regulate blood sugar. Your daily requirement for vitamins, minerals and antioxidants is greatly increased, especially if frequent urination is one of your symptoms. Talk to your doctor about safely managing your metabolic risk factors with vitamins and supplements before you buy supplements.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health. For more information about C-Salts, otherwise known as the best Vitamin C, or about other Vitamin C powder products, visit http://www.nutri.com where you can buy Vitamins and Supplements of the highest quality.