Posts Tagged ‘best vitamin c’

Vitamins and Supplements for Arthritis: Part 2

Monday, December 22nd, 2014
Part 2

Do your research before you supplement for arthritis.

In “Vitamins and Supplements for Arthritis: Part 1” we discussed how glucosamine sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, and SAM-e supplements can help to relieve arthritis pain and improve joint condition. Now we will continue delving into which vitamins and supplements are actually proven to improve osteoarthritis conditions. Don’t waste your money on supplements that offer no real benefit or relief to you. Use the actual research to decide which vitamins and supplements may actually offer the benefits that you’re looking for.
(more…)

Reduce Sodium by Increasing C-Salts?

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013
Lower Blood Pressure Naturally

Naturally Lower Sodium, Increase Potassium and Lower Blood Pressure with C-Salts Powdered Vitamin C.

Current studies show that even small reductions in sodium intake reduce blood pressure significantly. Reducing high blood pressure reduces your risk of heart attacks, heart disease, and stroke. Through the years, many people have said to us, “Oh I can’t take C-Salts because I need to reduce my sodium.” Well, this is a common misconception because C-Salts have NO SODIUM. In fact, C-Salts reduce sodium and decrease blood pressure.
(more…)

Vitamin C Prevents and Cures Heat Exhaustion

Friday, June 29th, 2012

Do you feel like the heat just drains you of energy? Do other people seem fine at a heat level that is intolerable to you? It could be your vitamin and mineral levels. Vitamin C, magnesium, zinc, calcium, sodium, potassium, and of course water need to be replaced after being exposed to the heat.

People with diabetes, people over 40, people who urinate frequently, and people with hyperhidrosis (a condition where a person has more sweat glands than are necessary and sweating is excessive) need to replenish B vitamins, vitamin C, and minerals lost through sweating at almost double the rate of other people. We start losing our sense of thirst after about age 40 and it’s common for elderly people to barely be able to sense thirst at all. This puts them at a much higher risk for heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Every time you sweat, you lose the vitamins and electrolytes that give your muscles the energy that they need to work. If you are low in any of these nutrients, you will automatically feel sleepy and fatigued when you are exposed to the heat. Replacing these vitamins and minerals is essential to recovery from the heat.

Studies have shown that people suffering from heat exhaustion and heat stroke are almost always deficient in vitamin C as well as other water soluble vitamins, like B vitamins. The body requires double the amount of water in hot weather than it does in cooler weather. It flushes out water soluble vitamins with sweat. This has a lot of ramifications on your health, energy, mental state, and immune system.

There are a lot of side effects that you’ll notice if you’re running low on water soluble vitamins or minerals that are lost when you sweat. Hot flashes, anemia (insufficient iron), fatigue, loss of appetite, depression, abdominal discomfort, respiratory infections, hair loss, muscle cramps, gum disease, dry skin and dry hair are most common. Because the nervous system requires so much fluid, B vitamins, electrolytes, and vitamin C to function, many people will experience headaches, migraines, nerve pain, and neurological disturbances, including hallucinations, confusion, and even seizures.

Drinking sports drinks can help you to replace electrolytes, but many people are sensitive to the artificial sweeteners or sugar in them. A good alternative is to supplement with the best vitamin C, a non-acidic buffered vitmain C powder that contains calcium, magnesium, zinc and potassium. Supplementing with a B vitamin complex is also advisable under a doctor’s supervision. Drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, whether you feel thirsty or not to guard against dehydration.

Supplementing and being diligent about hydration can help you to tolerate higher temperatures for longer periods of time. Not only will you be more comfortable, you’ll feel better and avoid the dangers of heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

About the Author: Stacy A. Pessoney is Wholesale Nutrition’s Chief Editor and Communications Research Director. She has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with the help of vitamins and supplements, focusing on sodium ascorbate in the form of vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Sources:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/458415-vitamin-deficiency-caused-by-excessive-sweating/
http://www.earthclinic.com/CURES/heat_exhaustion.html
http://www.livestrong.com/article/268689-vitamins-for-heat-exhaustion/
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002350.htm

Profuse Sweating


http://www.medicinenet.com/heat_stroke/article.htm

Stroke Morbidity Tripled for Anemic Patients

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

Iron is necessary for oxygen to be transported in the blood. Iron binds to oxygen in the bloodstream and carries it to all of the cells in the body that need the oxygen molecules to perform. Without iron, oxygen cannot be delivered to cells and the cells die.

Iron is also needed to diffuse oxygen through muscle cells, providing us with energy when we need it. Iron is used in DNA synthesis and cell division; helping your body to age more slowly and renew itself when necessary. Iron is also necessary for producing connective tissues, neurotransmitters, and maintaining the immune system.

Iron deficiency can cause anemia, the condition of having a low red blood cell count or low quantity of hemoglobin. Symptoms include fatigue, paleness, fast or irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath, cognitive or learning problems, cold hands and feet, and headaches.

Studies on anemia have shown that people who have a heart attack, heart failure, or kidney disease are more likely to die within a year if they are anemic. Stroke patients are now being added to that list and anemia is considered a “potent predictor of dying throughout the first year after a stroke” according to Jason Sico, M.D., lead researcher and assistant professor of neurology at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut.

The study was conducted on 3,750 men treated for their first ischemic stroke, the most common type of stroke. The study reported the following:

1) Patients with severe anemia were 3.5 times more likely to die while still in the hospital and 2.5 times more likely to die within a year.

2) Stroke survivors with moderate anemia were twice as likely to die within six to 12 months after a stroke.

3) People with mild anemia were about 1.5 times more likely to die within six to 12 months after a stroke.

An important thing to remember when trying to keep up your iron levels is that lots of minerals compete for iron uptake in the digestive tract. Many people believe they are taking enough iron, but then their other supplements are preventing the iron from being absorbed. Calcium is the main culprit in iron not being properly absorbed.

On the other hand, there are vitamins that can help iron to be absorbed. Ascorbic acid, or vitamin C, is a potent enhancer of iron absorption. Studies have shown that vitamin C added to a meal can increase iron absorption by up to five times.

To avoid the interaction between calcium and iron, the National Institutes of Health recommends taking calcium supplements at bedtime. This brings to question the best vitamin C supplements to take with your meals for maximum iron absorption.

Most vitamin C supplements on the market are calcium ascorbate, which gives you a healthy dose of calcium with your vitamin C. There are buffered vitamin C products that are much easier on the stomach and more beneficial to take with meals, two of which are sodium ascorbate and C-Salts. Or, if you can tolerate the acidity of vitamin C without a buffering agent then pure vitamin C powder may the best vitamin C supplement option for you.

About the Author: Stacy A. Pessoney is Wholesale Nutrition’s Chief Editor and Communications Research Director. She has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with the help of vitamins and supplements, focusing on sodium ascorbate in the form of vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/anemia/ds00321/dsection=symptoms
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120202094558.htm
http://www.anemia.org/patients/feature-articles/content.php?contentid=000441&sectionid=00015
http://www.noharmfoundation.org/?page_id=387
http://www.livestrong.com/article/195033-what-supplements-can-interfere-with-iron-absorption/
http://www.chemistry.wustl.edu/~courses/genchem/Tutorials/Ferritin/IronBody.htm

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Should Kids Take Vitamin C?

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

Vitamin C plays many roles in the human body beyond boosting immunity. Children especially can benefit from getting enough vitamin C to support their growing bodies and developing systems. You may be surprised what all appropriate vitamin C levels can do for your children.

Vitamin C helps the adrenal glands to produce stress coping hormones. Cortisol levels are regulated when vitamin C is present, helping to reduce the amount of physical and emotional stress on the body. Learning impairment, memory problems, and depression are caused by an imbalance in stress hormones. Vitamin C studies show that cortisol levels are greatly reduced when levels are good, even in the face of repeated highly stressful situations.

Vitamin C is necessary for growth. Growth hormones are produced when appropriate levels of vitamin C are present in the blood. Obesity and diabetes are associated with reduced amounts of growth hormones. Long-term vitamin C deficiencies can cause growth hormone secretion abnormalities that can have a very negative effect on the health of your children.

Vitamin C helps bones to grow. It helps to maintain a good balance between old bone resorption and new bone formation. High vitamin C intake is associated with lower fracture rates and higher bone mass. It is considered “critical” for maintaining healthy bones, teeth and gums, especially in growing and developing children.

Vitamin C is needed to detoxify the body of harmful chemicals. It protects cells from environmental assaults and free radicals. It sweeps the blood of dangerous toxins and helps to keep cells healthy. This, in turn, keeps levels of inflammation down, preventing a multitude of inflammatory induced diseases.

Vitamin C is great for allergies. Allergy medications are either antihistamines or histamine blockers. Vitamin C is both. This means that it not only keeps histamines from forming, but it also blocks the histamine receptors. It calms and regulates the body’s allergy response, which is great for overactive or underactive immune systems.

Vitamin C boosts the immune system. It not only helps the body react appropriately to invaders, it also helps to keep cells from letting them in. It doesn’t kill viruses, but it does keep them from producing the chemicals that they need to reproduce. When viruses are contracted and enough vitamin C is present, children may not exhibit any symptoms of illness. Their immune systems will simply take the time that they need to create an immunity to the virus that is present, but the virus won’t be allowed to invade cells and replicate like they would in the absence of vitamin C.

Speak with your child’s doctor about using any vitamins and supplements. The best vitamin C is generally one that is buffered, non-acidic, and comes in the form of a vitamin C powder.

About the Author: Stacy A. Pessoney is Wholesale Nutrition’s Chief Editor and Communications Research Director. She has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with the help of vitamins and supplements, focusing on sodium ascorbate in the form of vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Why Do I Need Vitamin C?

Friday, April 27th, 2012

Vitamin C does a lot more than help you to get over or avoid the common cold and flu. It is a potent antioxidant that is critical in helping your body to carry out many of its normal processes. Since vitamin C can only be consumed through diet or vitamins and supplements, it is necessary to consider what you could be doing to your body by failing to get enough.

Vitamin C is responsible for the function and repair of your bones, lungs, circulatory system, joints, immune system, and more. The recommended daily allowance by the government is just enough to keep a perfectly healthy person from developing a deficiency disease, such as scurvy. If you are exposed to any type of pollutant, allergen, chemical, or food additive then your daily requirement to stay healthy increases. Even stress and exercise produce free radicals that lead to oxidative stress, greatly increasing the need for vitamin C.

Free radicals are responsible for creating infection. Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, protects cells, proteins and lipids from free radical damage. It also improves the function and life span of immune cells. This helps the body to defend itself from almost every infectious disease. It also has a dramatic effect on existing infections. An article in Life Extension Magazine reported that “studies of vitamin C supplementation in military personnel and other subjects living in close quarters have shown that pneumonia occurred a remarkable 80-100% less often in subjects taking vitamin C than in those who did not supplement with the vitamin”.

Vitamin C is also responsible for the production of collagen and elastin, which are the major components of connective tissues all over your body. All of your bones, joints, blood vessels and organs are constantly experiencing cell death and renewal. They are in constant need of collagen and elastin to repair themselves. Without enough, we experience unhealthy aging, cancers, high cholesterol, degraded neurotransmitters, improper hormone production, and a long list of inflammatory, degenerative, and infectious diseases.

Vitamin C is needed to properly produce cells, absorb calcium and iron, and prevent diseases such as cataracts, cancer, and heart disease. It also is necessary to regulate blood clotting, which prevents clotting and bleeding disorders.

Ascorbic acid is needed for dental health as well. Your gums are generally the first place that you will notice a difference if you’re not getting enough vitamin C. They are made up almost entirely of connective tissue that is stressed every time you bite down or clench your teeth. You may notice your gums most dramatically turning red, swelling, receding, or bleeding around the teeth that touch first when you gently close your jaw. This is because the gums experience the most stress in these areas. Gums that are inflamed or weak due to a lack of vitamin C are susceptible to gum disease. Gum disease starts as plaque, which recent studies have shown cannot form if proper levels of vitamin C are maintained. Even sailors in the 18th century knew that if their gums started bleeding that they were in danger of scurvy. This is still why many doctors use the health of your gums to determine if you’re on your way to cardiovascular disease, arthritis, lung dysfunction, high blood pressure, stroke, and many other health problems.

Ask your doctor about supplementing with vitamin C. If you have stomach or digestive issues, you can take a buffered form of vitamin C that is non-acidic, like sodium ascorbate vitamin C powder.

Sources:
http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2006/oct2006_report_vitaminc_01.htm
http://altmedicine.about.com/od/healthconditionsdisease/a/gum_disease.htm

Reprinting:
This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

VITAMIN C AND ACIDITY

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

Here at Wholesale Nutrition, we highly value valid research related to vitamins and supplements. We are continually impressed with the reports from Orthomolecular Medicine News Service and would like to share some of their content with you from time to time. We hope you find it as fascinating as we do!

VITAMIN C AND ACIDITY
What Form is Best?

(OMNS, December 8, 2009) Vitamin C is commonly taken in large quantities to improve health and prevent asthma, allergies, viral infection, and heart disease [1,2]. It is non-toxic and non-immunogenic, and does not irritate the stomach as drugs like aspirin can. Yet vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) is acidic. So, a common question is, what are the effects from taking large quantities?

Ascorbic acid is a weak acid (pKa= 4.2) [3], only slightly stronger than vinegar. When dissolved in water, vitamin C is sour but less so than citric acid found in lemons and limes. Can large quantities of a weak acid such as ascorbate cause problems in the body? The answer is, sometimes, in some situations. However, with some simple precautions they can be avoided.

Acid in the Mouth
First of all, any acid can etch the surfaces of your teeth. This is the reason the dentist cleans your teeth and warns about plaque, for acid generated by bacteria in the mouth can etch your teeth to cause cavities. Cola soft drinks contain phosphoric acid, actually used by dentists to etch teeth before tooth sealants are applied. Like soft drinks, ascorbic acid will not cause etching of teeth if only briefly present. Often, vitamin C tablets are coated with a tableting ingredient such as magnesium stearate which prevents the ascorbate from dissolving immediately. Swallowing a vitamin C tablet without chewing it prevents its acid from harming tooth enamel.

Chewable Vitamin C Tablets
Chewables are popular because they taste sweet and so are good for encouraging children to take their vitamin C [4]. However, some chewable vitamin C tablets can contain sugar and ascorbic acid which, when chewed, is likely to stick in the crevices of your teeth. So, after chewing a vitamin C tablet, a good bit of advice is to rinse with water or brush your teeth. But the best way is to specifically select non-acidic vitamin C chewables, readily available in stores. Read the label to verify that the chewable is made entirely with non-acidic vitamin C.

Stomach Acidity
People with sensitive stomachs may report discomfort when large doses of vitamin C are taken at levels to prevent an acute viral infection (1,000-3,000 milligrams or more every 20 minutes) [1, 5]. In this case the ascorbic acid in the stomach can build up enough acidity to cause heartburn or a similar reaction. On the other hand, many people report no problems with acidity even when taking 20,000 mg in an hour. The acid normally present in the stomach, hydrochloric acid (HCl), is very strong: dozens of times more acidic than vitamin C. When one has swallowed a huge amount of ascorbate, the digestive tract is sucking it up into the bloodstream as fast as it can, but it may still take a while to do so. Some people report that they seem to sense ascorbic acid tablets “sitting” at the bottom of the stomach as they take time to dissolve. It is fairly easy to fix the problem by using buffered ascorbate, or taking ascorbic acid with food or liquids in a meal or snack. When the amount of vitamin C ingested is more than the gut can absorb, the ascorbate attracts water into the intestines creating a laxative effect. This saturation intake is called bowel tolerance. One should reduce the amount (by 20-50%) when this occurs [1].

Acid Balance in the Body
Does taking large quantities of an acid, even a weak acid like ascorbate, tip the body’s acid balance (pH) causing health problems? No, because the body actively and constantly controls the pH of the bloodstream. The kidneys regulate the acid in the body over a long time period, hours to days, by selectively excreting either acid or basic components in urine. Over a shorter time period, minutes to hours, if the blood is too acid, the autonomic nervous system increases the rate of breathing, thereby removing more carbon dioxide from the blood, reducing its acidity. Some foods can indirectly cause acidity. For example, when more protein is eaten than necessary for maintenance and growth, it is metabolized into acid, which must be removed by the kidneys, generally as uric acid. In this case, calcium and/or magnesium are excreted along with the acid in the urine which can deplete our supplies of calcium and magnesium [6]. However, because ascorbic acid is a weak acid, we can tolerate a lot before it will much affect the body’s acidity. Although there have been allegations about vitamin C supposedly causing kidney stones, there is no evidence for this, and its acidity and diuretic tendency actually tends to reduce kidney stones in most people who are prone to them [1,7]. Ascorbic acid dissolves calcium phosphate stones and dissolves struvite stones. Additionally, while vitamin C does increase oxalate excretion, vitamin C simultaneously inhibits the union of calcium and oxalate. [1,2].

Forms of Vitamin C
Ascorbate comes in many forms, each with a particular advantage. Ascorbic acid is the least expensive and can be purchased as tablets, timed release tablets, or powder. The larger tablets (1000-1500 mg) are convenient and relatively inexpensive. Timed-release tablets contain a long-chain carbohydrate which delays the stomach in dissolving the ascorbate, which is then released over a period of hours. This may have an advantage for maintaining a high level in the bloodstream. Ascorbic acid powder or crystals can be purchased in bulk relatively inexpensively. Pure powder is more quickly dissolved than tablets and therefore can be absorbed somewhat faster by the body. Linus Pauling favored taking pure ascorbic acid, as it is entirely free of tableting excipients.

Buffered Ascorbate
A fraction of a teaspoon of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) has long been used as a safe and effective antacid which immediately lowers stomach acidity. When sodium bicarbonate is added to ascorbic acid, the bicarbonate fizzes (emitting carbon dioxide) which then releases the sodium to neutralize the acidity of the ascorbate.

Calcium ascorbate can be purchased as a powder and readily dissolves in water or juice. In this buffered form ascorbate is completely safe for the mouth and sensitive stomach and can be applied directly to the gums to help heal infections [8]. It is a little more expensive than the equivalent ascorbic acid and bicarbonate but more convenient. Calcium ascorbate has the advantage of being non-acidic. It has a slightly metallic taste and is astringent but not sour like ascorbic acid. 1000 mg of calcium ascorbate contains about 110 mg of calcium.

Other forms of buffered ascorbate include sodium ascorbate and magnesium ascorbate [9]. Most adults need 800 – 1200 mg of calcium and 400-600 mg of magnesium daily [6]. The label on the bottle of all these buffered ascorbates details how much “elemental” mineral is contained in a teaspoonful. They cost a little more than ascorbic acid.

Buffered forms of ascorbate are often better tolerated at higher doses than ascorbic acid, but they appear not to be as effective for preventing the acute symptoms of a cold. This may be because after they are absorbed they require absorbing an electron from the body to become effective as native ascorbate [1]. Some of types of vitamin C are proprietary formulas that claim benefits over standard vitamin C [9].

Liposomal Vitamin C
Recently a revolutionary form of ascorbate has become available. This form of vitamin C is packaged inside nano-scale phospholipid spheres (“liposomes”), much like a cell membrane protects its contents. The lipid spheres protect the vitamin C from degradation by the environment and are absorbed more quickly into the bloodstream. Liposomes are also known to facilitate intracellular uptake of their contents, which can cause an added clinical impact when delivering something such as vitamin C. This form is supposed to be 5-10 fold more absorbable than straight ascorbic acid. It is more expensive than ascorbic acid tablets or powder.

Ascorbyl Palmitate
Ascorbyl palmitate is composed of an ascorbate molecule bound to a palmitic acid molecule. It is amphipathic, meaning that it can dissolve in either water or fat, like the fatty acids in cell membranes. It is widely used as an antioxidant in processed foods, and used in topical creams where it is thought to be more stable than vitamin C. However, when ingested, the ascorbate component of ascorbyl palmitate is thought to be decomposed into the ascorbate and palmitic acid molecules so its special amphipathic quality is lost. It is also more expensive than ascorbic acid.

Natural Ascorbate
Natural forms of ascorbate derived from plants are available. Acerola, the “Barbados cherry,” contains a large amount of vitamin C, depending on its ripeness, and was traditionally used to fight off colds. Tablets of vitamin C purified from acerola or rose hips are available but are generally low-dose and considerably more expensive than ascorbic acid. Although some people strongly advocate this type, Pauling and many others have stated that such naturally-derived vitamin C is no better than pure commercial ascorbate [2,9]. Bioflavonoids are antioxidants found in citrus fruits or rose hips and are thought to improve uptake and utilization of vitamin C. Generally, supplement tablets that contain bioflavonoids do not have enough to make much difference. For consumers on a budget, the best policy may be to buy vitamin C inexpensively whether or not it also contains bioflavonoids. Citrus fruits, peppers, and a number of other fruits and vegetables contain large quantities of bioflavinoids. This is one more reason to eat right as well as supplement.

References:

[1] Hickey S, Saul AW (2008) Vitamin C: The Real Story, the Remarkable and Controversial Healing Factor. ISBN-13: 9781591202233

[2] Pauling L (1986) How to Live Longer and Feel Better, by Linus Pauling (Revised version, 2006) ISBN-13: 9780870710964

[3] Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (2004), CRC Press, ISBN-13: 978-0849304859

[4] http://www.doctoryourself.com/megakid.html (Ideas on how to get children to take vitamin C.)

[5] Cathcart RF (1981) Vitamin C, titrating to bowel tolerance, anascorbemia, and acute induced scurvy. Med Hypotheses. 7:1359-1376.

[6] Dean C (2006) The Magnesium Miracle. (2006) ISBN-13: 9780345494580

[7] http://www.doctoryourself.com/kidney.html

[8] http://www.doctoryourself.com/gums.html (Healing gums with buffered ascorbate.)
See also: Riordan HD, Jackson, JA (1991) Topical ascorbate stops prolonged bleeding from tooth extraction. J Orthomolecular Med, 6:3-4, p 202. http://www.orthomolecular.org/library/jom/1991/pdf/1991-v06n03&04-p202.pdf or http://www.doctoryourself.com/news/v3n18.txt

[9] http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminC/vitCform.html (Information about different forms of vitamin C)

[10] http://www.doctoryourself.com/bioflavinoids.html

Nutritional Medicine is Orthomolecular Medicine

Orthomolecular medicine uses safe, effective nutritional therapy to fight illness. For more information: http://www.orthomolecular.org

The peer-reviewed Orthomolecular Medicine News Service is a non-profit and non-commercial informational resource.

Editorial Review Board:

Carolyn Dean, M.D., N.D.
Damien Downing, M.D.
Michael Gonzalez, D.Sc., Ph.D.
Steve Hickey, Ph.D.
James A. Jackson, PhD
Bo H. Jonsson, MD, Ph.D
Thomas Levy, M.D., J.D.
Jorge R. Miranda-Massari, Pharm.D.
Erik Paterson, M.D.
Gert E. Shuitemaker, Ph.D.

Andrew W. Saul, Ph.D., Editor and contact person. Email: [email protected]

Original post at http://www.orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v05n10.shtml

Vitamin C Vital to Dental Health

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

Bleeding gums are not only a sign of poor dental health, but also a sign of low vitamin C levels. Scurvy, or vitamin C deficiency, is characterized by hair and tooth loss, joint pain and swelling, bleeding, bruising easily, and fatigue. This is because vitamin C is needed to create collagen, the connective tissue that binds together everything in our bodies. Without it, you literally begin to fall apart.

Our bodies are constantly breaking down old tissues and rebuilding new ones with collagen. Even our bones go through this process. Because the gums use so much collagen, you will quickly notice if they’re not getting enough. It has been established that our gums turn over about 20% of their collagen every day.

Collagen builds up the gums, giving them the strength and health that they need to support circulation and tooth adherence. Receding gums also contribute to a receding gum line and tooth sensitivity that can be quickly overcome or vastly improved by consuming adequate amounts of vitamin C. Every time our teeth touch each other they use a little vitamin C. This is why you will notice that the teeth that touch first when you gently close your jaw will have the most gum recession, decay, and plaque. People that grind or clench their teeth will especially notice extra sensitivity and gum problems because of their increased need for vitamin C every day.

Inadequate vitamin C can lead to periodontal disease by opening up the tooth “pockets”. This can cause the gums to bleed and the teeth to fall out, but still at a slower rate than vitamin C deficiency does. Vitamin C keeps the bone around the root of the tooth from shrinking and causing the tooth to loosen by allowing the absorption of calcium into the bone and keeping the bone and tooth matrix strong.

Vitamin C also inhibits the formation of plaque and tartar. In the same manor that vitamin C removes plaque from artery walls and prevents new plaque from forming, it prevents and removes plaque from teeth. In fact, it has been referred to as the “invisible toothbrush” because in studies, people that only brushed their teeth once per day and consumed higher amounts of vitamin C had less plaque and bacteria on their teeth than the other participants that brushed their teeth two or more times per day. Pay attention to your gums if you start supplementing. You could notice your gums tightening as early as the first day.

The “Recommended Daily Allowance” of vitamins is based on the prevention of deficiency and scurvy in a perfectly healthy person, not the individual needs of someone specific. According to the Linus Pauling Institute, an average amount needed per day to prevent heart disease, periodontal disease and cancer is around 10,000 mg per day. That’s the equivalent of about 100 large oranges per day or 72 cups of orange juice per day. It’s no wonder that over 95% of Americans have tooth decay, periodontal disease or gingivitis.

The best vitamin C for dental health is sodium ascorbate. Mineral ascorbates, or mineral salts of sodium ascorbate, lack the acidity of other forms of vitamin C, therefore causing less tooth erosion and stomach discomfort in higher doses. If you take vitamin C in the form of calcium ascorbate, make sure that you do not exceed 2500 mg of calcium in a 24 hour period. Because of the dangers of overdosing on calcium, sodium ascorbate, like the vitamin c found in our vitamin C powder, is recommended for higher vitamin C intakes.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

http://www.cforyourself.com/Conditions/Dental_Health/dental_health.html
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminC/
http://www.doctoryourself.com/toothbrush.html
http://osteoporosis.emedtv.com/calcium/calcium-overdose.html
http://www.gum-disease-teeth-oral-ada.com/ascorbate.htm

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

How to Maximize Your Vitamin C Benefits

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Learning how to correctly take your vitamin C can help you to increase the benefits that you get from it. Vitamin C will give you protection from scurvy at minimal levels, but won’t necessarily provide you with symptom relief or protection from major diseases unless it is taken at a high enough level. It’s hard to say what the correct “daily requirement” of vitamin C is because everyone has a different level of stress or disease in their body. Therefore, learning how to find the right dosage for your condition and your body can be greatly beneficial.

In general, bowel tolerance of ascorbic acid is proportionate to the toxicity of your disease. In other words, you won’t eliminate excess vitamin C until it’s out of things to correct in your body. Therefore, a daily dose when you’re healthy can range anywhere from 1 to 20 grams per day, depending on the condition and need of your body. One study showed that people with influenza (the flu) or mononucleosis (mono), could take up to 200 grams of vitamin C daily without stomach discomfort or diarrhea. In fact, for severe illnesses such as these, marked improvement was not shown until the dosage of ascorbic acid reached near the bowel tolerance level. The reason that you may not feel better when taking smaller doses of vitamin C is that it is quickly destroyed by injured tissues, disease, and stress. Think of it as trying to wash mud off of your arm with only a few drops of water. It may get smeared around, but the mud is still there. Only with larger and larger amounts of water would you be able to clean off the mud.

Vitamin C works by scavenging free radicals produced by stress, infection, inflammation, germs, bacteria, illness and disease. Not only do diseases and injuries cause damaging free radicals to form, they also lead to the formation of other diseases. Almost every disease is caused by and/or produces free radicals. Infection, heart disease, cancer, burns, trauma, aging, allergies, and autoimmune diseases are all included.

Taking vitamin C daily can vastly reduce your chances of developing a giant list of health conditions. Vitamin C is very sensitive to stress and is generally the first vitamin to be depleted by it. Without enough vitamin C in your system daily, stress can take its toll on your immune system very quickly. Vitamin C is known to bring balance to an overactive or weakened immune system. It does the same for your stress response, helping to control anxiety, overproduction of cortisol (stress hormone), and inflammation.

Many people don’t realize that vitamin C is required by our bodies daily to maintain cartilage, bones and teeth. It is also necessary for producing collagen, absorbing iron, and controlling cholesterol levels. Our bodies go from growing and developing to breaking down and aging. Our cells and connective tissues, even bone, are always regenerating. If enough vitamin C isn’t available for the production of collagen and elastin, our bodies will improvise by using hard, inflexible cholesterol plaques to repair tiny tears and injuries. This is how arteries harden, joints become more prone to damage, and wrinkles form.

Talk with your doctor about supplementing with the best vitamin C, sodium ascorbate vitamin C powder. This highly absorbable, non-acidic form of vitamin C is the most economical and easiest way to get your perfect daily dose of vitamin C.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:
http://www.mall-net.com/cathcart/faces.html
http://www.cforyourself.com/Overview/Primer/What_C_Does/why_take_c.html
http://www.webmd.com/diet/guide/the-benefits-of-vitamin-c?page=3

Are Vitamins and Supplements Safe?

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012

Here at Wholesale Nutrition, we highly value valid research related to vitamins and supplements. We are continually impressed with the reports from Orthomolecular Medicine News Service and would like to share some of their content with you from time to time. We hope you find it as fascinating as we do!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Orthomolecular Medicine News Service, December 28, 2011

No Deaths from Vitamins
America’s Largest Database Confirms Supplement Safety

(OMNS, Dec 28, 2011) There was not even one death caused by a vitamin supplement in 2010, according to the most recent information collected by the U.S. National Poison Data System.

The new 203-page annual report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers, published online at http://www.aapcc.org/dnn/Portals/0/2010%20NPDS%20Annual%20Report.pdf, shows zero deaths from multiple vitamins; zero deaths from any of the B vitamins; zero deaths from vitamins A, C, D, or E; and zero deaths from any other vitamin.

Additionally, there were no deaths whatsoever from any amino acid or dietary mineral supplement.

Three people died from non-supplement mineral poisoning: two from medical use of sodium and one from non-supplemental iron. On page 131, the AAPCC report specifically indicates that the iron fatality was not from a nutritional supplement.

Fifty-seven poison centers provide coast-to-coast data for the National Poison Data System, “one of the few real-time national surveillance systems in existence, providing a model public health surveillance system for all types of exposures, public health event identification, resilience response and situational awareness tracking.”

Well over half of the U.S. population takes daily nutritional supplements. Even if each of those people took only one single tablet daily, that makes 165,000,000 individual doses per day, for a total of over 60 billion doses annually. Since many persons take far more than just one single vitamin or mineral tablet, actual consumption is considerably higher, and the safety of nutritional supplements is all the more remarkable.

Over 60 billion doses of vitamin and mineral supplements per year in the USA, and not a single fatality. Not one.

If vitamin and mineral supplements are allegedly so “dangerous,” as the FDA and news media so often claim, then where are the bodies?

Reference:

Bronstein AC, Spyker DA, Cantilena LR Jr, Green JL, Rumack BH, Dart RC. 2010 Annual Report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers’ National Poison Data System (NPDS): 28th Annual Report. The full text article is available for free download at http://www.aapcc.org/dnn/Portals/0/2010%20NPDS%20Annual%20Report.pdf

The data mentioned above are found in Table 22B. Mineral data on page 131; vitamin data on pages 137-139 .

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.