Posts Tagged ‘alcohol effects’

Three Ways to Improve Memory: Caffeine, Cocoa Powder & Alcohol Consumption

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

Memory, Cognition, Long-Term Memory

Surprising Ways to Improve Your Memory!

Caffeine

A research study published in Nature Neuroscience stated that among the health benefits of caffeine is that a 200mg dose after a learning session boosts long-term memory. Caffeine has been shown in many studies to enhance cognitive memory. However, until now, there have been very few studies to show its effects on long-term memory.

This study involved 160 participants between the ages of 18 and 30 years. Participants were given doses of 100-300mg of caffeine after their learning sessions. The 200mg group showed the greatest improvement in long-term memory.

Cocoa Powder

Researchers at Columbia University published a study in Nature Neuroscience showing that flavanols present in cocoa reversed age-related memory decline. Memory decline begins in early adulthood, but may not be noticed until the age of 50-60 years. Flavanols in cocoa have been linked to improvements in brain connections in the area of the brain responsible for memory. Participants in the study following a high-flavanol diet performed much better on memory tests than those following the low-flavanol criteria.

Dr. Small of the research team stated that “If a participant had the memory of a typical 60-year-old at the beginning of the study, after 3 months that person on average had the memory of a typical 30- or 40-year-old.”

Consumption of cocoa powder improves skin condition by increasing blood flow to subcutaneous tissues. It increases skin density and skin hydration, improving skin texture, and even gives skin photoprotection. Flavanols in cocoa also have favorable effects on blood pressure, platelet aggregation, thrombosis (blood clotting), inflammation, and the vascular system as a whole.

Alcohol Consumption

A collaborative study between the University of Texas Medical Branch, the University of Kentucky, and the University of Maryland shows that light alcohol consumption later in life is linked to having better memory and event recall. 660 participants without dementia or a history of alcohol abuse were evaluated in this study.

“Results showed that light and moderate alcohol consumption in older individuals is linked with higher episodic memory – the ability to recall memories of events – and larger volume in the hippocampus, a region of the brain important for episodic memory.”

About the Author: Stacy A. Pessoney is Wholesale Nutrition’s Chief Editor and Communications Research Director. She has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with the help of vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder in the form of buffered vitamin C. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003986112000823

http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nn.3850.html
Nature Neuroscience (2014) doi:10.1038/nn.3850

http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nn.3850.html#references

http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/cocoas-flavanols-reverse-age-related-memory-decline

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/284331.php
Effects of Alcohol Consumption on Cognition and Regional Brain Volumes Among Older Adults, Brian Downer, et al., American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias, doi: 10.1177/1533317514549411, published 7 September 2014. UTMB news release, accessed 23 October 2014.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/284400.php
Enhancing dentate gyrus function with dietary flavanols improves cognition in older adults, Scott Small, et al., Nature Neuroscience, published online 26 October 2014, abstract.
Columbia University Medical Center news release, accessed 24 October 2014 via Newswise.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/270963.php
Post-study caffeine administration enhances memory consolidation in humans, doi:10.1038/nn.3623, Daniel Borota, Elizabeth Murray, Gizem Keceli, Allen Chang, Joseph M Watabe, Maria Ly, John P Toscano, Michael A Yassa, published in Nature Neuroscience, 12 January 2014.

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