Archive for the ‘Vitamin K’ Category

Combat Chronic Inflammation with Vitamins

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014
Arthritis Vitamins Inflammation Hands

Inflammation not only hurts, but it destroys tissues and causes disease. Learn how to avoid chronic inflammation with vitamins and supplements.

Inflammation is your body’s main defense mechanism, meant to anticipate, intercept and destroy invading microorganisms. Inflammation causes redness, swelling, heat and pain. Inflammation helps your immune system fight invaders and heal injuries, but can be dangerous if it becomes chronic.

Inflammation becomes a danger when it is brought on by malfunctions of the immune system. Autoimmune diseases and allergies are good examples. Out of the ten leading causes of death in the United States, chronic, low-level inflammation causes seven of them. This includes Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, nephritis, heart disease, cancer, stroke, and chronic lower respiratory disease.
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6 Important Vitamins for Immune System Health

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

Vitamins are the regulators of the body. They are essential to a wide variety of bodily processes, including tissue repair, tissue growth, and cell differentiation. Cell differentiation is when a cell becomes specialized so that it can perform another function.

For example, an immune system cell can learn which pathogens to defend against by becoming specialized. Another cell might become specialized in tissue repair depending on the signals that it receives from the immune system. If vitamins are deficient and/or disease is affecting the immune system, cells may not differentiate. This can lead to deformities, such as cancer, slow or inadequate healing or chronic inflammation.

Immune system problems generally revolve around being over or underactive. Paying attention to your body and recognizing when you are having symptoms of vitamin deficiencies can help you and your doctor to maintain normal vitamin levels and immune system function.

Vitamin A Vitamin A is known for its role in the growth and repair of bodily tissues. Specifically, it is helpful in maintaining healthy eyes, mucous membranes, and skin. Because of its important action on mucous membranes, vitamin A is believed to be a powerful preventer of different types of lung cancers. Vitamin A works by attacking free radicals that cause damage to the skin, eyes and mucous membranes.

B Vitamins B vitamins support the nervous system, muscles and heart. Vitamin B1 metabolizes proteins, carbohydrates and fats that are needed for energy. It is known to fight growing tumors and reverse some aspects of heart disease and aging. Vitamin B2 helps make antibodies that fight infections, specifically ones that affect the eyes and skin. Vitamin B12 is responsible for maintaining healthy red blood cells and nerves. It improves the function of blood vessels and circulation all over the body.

Vitamin C Vitamin C helps immunity in a variety of ways. It prevents oxidation of cholesterol in your veins and arteries, preventing build-up. It flushes the body of free radicals, protecting our delicately balanced hormonal systems from damage from environmental pollutants. It is crucial to the formation of collagen, which is needed to constantly repair all of the tissues of the body, including bones and joints.

Many people with stomach or digestive problems avoid vitamin C because of the acidity. This is a big mistake because without it, collagen cannot be produced, meaning that your bones, veins, arteries, muscles, skin, and organs will break down. If repairs can’t be made with collagen, the liver produces more and more LDL (bad cholesterol) to use instead. This can quickly lead to heart disease, hardened arteries, brittle bones, stroke, and other deadly conditions. A buffered vitamin C powder can be taken as an alternative to acidic citrus fruits or vitamin C supplements.

Vitamin D Vitamin D enables your bones to absorb calcium. It also triggers the T-cells of your immune system into attacking bacteria and viruses.

Vitamin E Vitamin E acts as a free radical scavenger, much like vitamin C. It helps to create red blood cells, which in turn more efficiently carry oxygen to all parts of the body and deliver iron to cells where it is needed. Vitamin E helps to prevent a host of blood related disorders and helps to signal the immune system to go where it is needed.

Vitamin K Vitamin K aids in proper kidney function so that harmful agents can be flushed from the body. It also helps to regulate blood sugar, controlling inflammation. Vitamin K is needed for blood clotting and enhances the functions of the liver.

About the Author: Stacy A. Pessoney is Wholesale Nutrition’s Chief Editor and Communications Research Director. She has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with the help of vitamins and supplements, focusing on sodium ascorbate in the form of vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

http://www.health-forever.com/articles/Immune-system-vitamins
https://chronicillnessrecovery.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4&Itemid=6
http://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/Cell_differentiation

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Part 2: Natural Cures for Acne

Friday, January 13th, 2012

Essential oils and other natural oils could be the answer that you’ve been searching for. There are a few oils that will make acne a lot worse, so you should just start buying lotions, cosmetics and sunscreens that contain oil. The oils with the lowest pore clogging probability can be extremely helpful in healing skin.

Besides not clogging pores, these oils actively heal skin and prevent future breakouts. They are highly absorbable and do not leave a shine or heavy oily film on the skin after application. Grapeseed oil, fractionated coconut oil and hazelnut oil have astringent properties and help to balance combination skin. Camellia oil prevents infection, heals acne and fades scars. Peach kernel oil, macadamia nut oil, avocado oil, emu oil, sweet almond oil, and even olive oil have great healing properties, absorb well into the skin and help to keep acne at bay.

Jojoba oil is wonderful for reducing sebum production because it so closely resembles natural human sebum. Many people like to use the lightest oils, like grapeseed or argan oil, as a “carrier” oil, or base for some of the other oils that may be heavier, but still have a lot of benefits for acne sufferers. If you plan on going this route, do some research first. Some oils cannot be used directly on the skin without a carrier oil. Some are very expensive and only need to be used in minute amounts to be effective, but may only have a shelf life of around six months. Make sure that you use new oils in a test area to check for allergies or sensitivities before applying them all over your face. With a little time and experimentation, you could find the perfect combination of natural oils for your skin.

Besides oils, you should avoid as many chemical products as possible. Choosing organic oils is best and using only mineral based cosmetics can be helpful in treating acne. Ask your doctor about doing a skin allergy test and a blood test before you start a regimen. Sometimes an allergy to an ingredient, like dimethicone, in a face or hair product that you are using is the culprit, not clogged pores and bacteria.

Deficiencies in B vitamins, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, chromium, selenium and/or zinc can cause skin to become unbalanced and acne can result. Zink aids in healing and regulates oil gland activity. Selenium inhibits the oxidation of fats and reduces inflammation. Chromium can be depleted by the intake of sugar and is needed to combat infections on the skin. Vitamin K is useful for fading scars and healing lesions. Vitamin E defends skin by preventing skin damage and repairing lesions.

B vitamins have a wide range of preventative and healing properties for the skin, including hormone balance, stress relief, circulation, the metabolization of proteins, sugars, carbohydrates and fats, moving nutrients and toxins into and out of the cells, removing waste products from skin cells, and enhancing the absorption of other vitamins.

Vitamin C, or sodium ascorbate, is unique. It removes toxins and free radicals from skin cells. It is necessary for new collagen and elastin to form, which is necessary for cells to be repaired. Vitamin C creates a protective barrier for cells so that they are less likely to be damaged. It also increases immune function, balances reactions to allergens, eliminates inflammation, increases absorption of vitamins and iron, reduces stress, and gives the skin an antibacterial layer.

Speak with your doctor about which options may be best for you.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Part 1: Natural Cures for Acne

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

For many, young and old, acne can be the bane of their existence. It usually starts at puberty and can go on, well into adulthood. Some people suffer painful, scarring, and unsightly acne for their entire lives. If you or someone you love is inflicted with this stubborn condition, it may be of interest to you to treat it with vitamins and supplements or other natural products.

If you feel like you’ve tried every product on the market without success, you’re not alone. Many people with acne have extremely sensitive skin, hence the inflammation and susceptibility to infection, and experience more problems when using harsh chemicals and acne treatments on their skin. Doctors routinely prescribe medications for acne, but they can take weeks to show any improvement at all and often times make skin more sensitive and intensify the problem. There are also a lot of unwanted side effects from these medications and antibiotics, such as skin and bowel blistering, extreme fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, headaches and more. Some even alter DNA, disrupt the endocrine system, and can cause long-term reproductive damage.

You may think that it will take an extreme drug or potent chemical to get rid of your stubborn acne, but you may find that the gentle, natural approach is what your skin has been craving all along. Getting to the root cause of your acne can help you best determine how to treat it. There are a few things that contribute to the condition. Vitamin deficiencies, over-production of skin sebum, and bacteria are the most common causes.

Acne generally sets in at puberty because the hormone changes bring about an increased production of skin oils and a wax referred to as sebum. These oils and waxes trap germs, dirt, and microscopic pieces of shedding skin to form a clogged pore or acne pustule. Most people automatically think that they need to rid the skin of the oil to get rid of the problem. This is somewhat true, because the oil traps a lot of dirt and toxins. Cleaning the skin with a very gentle cleanser two or three times a day is recommended. However, if you strip the skin of all oils and sebum, it will retaliate by producing a lot more oil and sebum.

Most people with oily or acne-prone skin avoid products that contain oil. Really, you need healthy oils on your skin. There are a few oils that do not clog pores, heal wounds, kill unwanted bacteria, fade scars, and control sebum production. You can also treat acne by checking on certain vitamin levels, like sodium ascorbate levels, with your doctor and supplementing to make sure that their levels are in check. In Part 2 of this series, we will discuss which vitamins help and why, as well as which natural products can help to finally rid your skin of acne, once and for all.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Part 2: Fat Soluble Vitamins

Friday, August 20th, 2010

Vitamin E is a fat soluble antioxidant. It helps to remove free radicals from the body and protects cells from the damaging effects of oxidation. It also aids in protecting vitamin C, vitamin A, and essential fatty acids from destruction in the body. Vitamin E deficiency is rare, especially in the US where vegetable oil is commonly consumed. Other food sources of vitamin E include seeds, nuts, nut oils, green leafy vegetables, tomatoes, canola oil, and broccoli.

Vitamin E studies suggest that it protects neurons in the brain from damage, especially after a stroke. It has also been shown to reduce cholesterol levels. However, patients taking blood thinners or statin cholesterol medications should not increase their intake of vitamin E, unless advised to do so by a physician. Vitamin E can interfere with these medications because it is a natural anti-coagulant.

Vitamin K aids in blood coagulation, calcium absorption and calcium bonding. It is used as an osteoporosis treatment in Japan, but the long-term effects are still unknown. Studies have shown that vitamin K can actually inhibit nerve cell death caused by oxidative stress, so further studies are being conducted to determine if vitamin K would be beneficial in treating neurological diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease. Studies have also revealed benefits in protecting people from developing liver and prostate cancers. Vitamin K is currently used topically to treat bruises, rosacea, dark circles under the eyes, and spider veins.

Vitamin K is found in leafy green vegetables, such as spinach, and some fruits, such as kiwi and avocado. It is relatively easy to get vitamin K from these sources, if they are consumed in conjunction with fats. Fats allow the intestines to absorb vitamin K, but good flora bacteria are also necessary for absorption.

Like vitamin E, vitamin K can also interfere with the actions of blood thinners and statin medications. Signs of deficiency include anemia, bruising, heavy menstrual bleeding, bleeding gums, or bleeding nose.

Therefore, vitamin K deficiency is mainly seen in people that have been on antibiotics, have recently had a virus or infection that affected the intestine, people who have been on long-term aspirin therapy, and people who have had intestinal surgery.

Remember to ask your doctor about supplementing with vitamins before you start to avoid drug interactions. If you do take vitamins and supplements, you can buy vitamins, wholesale vitamins, or discount vitamins online to reduce the cost of supplementing.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with discount vitamins and the best vitamin C since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality, low-cost wholesale vitamins today!

Part 1: Fat Soluble Vitamins

Wednesday, August 18th, 2010

Vitamins can be divided into two groups; water soluble and fat soluble. Water soluble vitamins make up 9 of the 13 vitamins used by humans. Water soluble vitamins (B complex and vitamin C) dissolve readily in water and are easily excreted from the body. They are not stored by the body and should be consumed daily. Fat soluble vitamins are absorbed in the intestinal tract with the aid of fats or lipids. These vitamins are stored by the body when they are not used, so daily consumption is not necessary.

Vitamins A, D, E and K make up the fat soluble vitamin group. These vitamins are not easily destroyed by food preparation, cooking, or storage like water soluble vitamins. Because of this and the fact that the body stores excesses in the liver and fatty tissues of the body, deficiencies are rare in the US.

Vitamin A is a nutrient necessary for proper bone, eye and tooth development. It is also responsible for many other bodily processes, including night vision and keeping the mucous membranes in the lungs, sinuses, mouth, nose and throat moist. Vitamin A is found mainly in fish, liver and dairy products. Deficiency can cause night blindness, blindness, and severely dry eyes and skin.

The human body can convert beta-carotene into vitamin A. So, other sources for getting your vitamin A include yellow and orange fruits, like mangoes and apricots. Vegetable sources include carrots, pumpkins, and dark green leafy vegetables. Because toxicity is more of a concern than deficiency, many dieticians recommend getting vitamin A from beta-carotene sources. You can check the label of your multi-vitamin to see if the vitamin A is in the form of beta-carotene.

If too much beta-carotene is stored in the liver, it can prevent the liver from storing other fat soluble vitamins. Also, once it is stored there, it cannot be converted into vitamin A. Therefore, you should be careful about how much you take if you are supplementing. Always work with your doctor when you’re on a vitamins and supplements regimen.

Vitamin D is necessary for the body to absorb and use calcium. Vitamin D is crucial in the development, restructuring, and healing of bones. Vitamin D is usually added to dairy products, but can also be obtained from sun exposure or oily fish, like cod, salmon and sardines.

Deficiency is more common with vitamin D than any of the other fat soluble vitamins. Our need for vitamin D increases as we age and our absorption of it decreases. Many people have trouble absorbing it or have difficulty maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D, so they are advised by their physician to take it in the form of vitamin D-3 instead. This is the form of vitamin D that is normally produced in the skin with sun exposure.

Insufficient levels of vitamin D have been associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease, high blood pressure, depression, and even cancer. When you visit your doctor, have them test your vitamin D levels and advise you on whether or not you should supplement.

Part 2 in the series “Fat Soluble Vitamins” will review the vitamins E and K. Remember to ask your doctor about supplementing with vitamins before you start to avoid drug interactions. If you do take vitamins and supplements, you can buy vitamins, wholesale vitamins, or discount vitamins online to reduce the cost of supplementing.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with discount vitamins and the best vitamin C since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality, low-cost wholesale vitamins today!