Archive for the ‘Ulcers’ Category

The Link between Dental Health, Heart Health and Diabetes

Thursday, June 26th, 2014
Oral Health Overall Health

What do your teeth and gums say about your overall health?

The health of your teeth and gums can offer you warning to other health conditions developing or existing in your body. Some oral health problems can affect your entire body. Learning the connections between your teeth, gums, and your body can help you to maintain good overall health and catch problems early, preventing disease and death.
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How to Heal Leaky Gut Syndrome

Friday, January 31st, 2014
Leaky Gut Syndrome Bone Broth

Could healing your gut also heal your disease?

In our article “Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases Caused by a Leaky Gut?” we described how a leaky gut happens, what diseases it causes, and what to avoid to keep your gut healthy. “Refined flours and highly processed foods are really hard on the epithelial lining of the gut. High glycemic index foods, dairy products, and gluten are damaging. High chronic caffeine use, excessive alcohol consumption, and overuse of antibiotics are bad for the epithelial lining. All of these things weaken the bonds between the cells letting particles escape.
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Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases Caused by a Leaky Gut?

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Intestinal Health Leaky Gut

Could a leaky gut be the source of all your disease?

Leaky gut syndrome is opening the eyes of people suffering from a wide array of conditions. Leaky gut is found in people with obesity, thyroid disorders, endocrine disorders, lupus, sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, epilepsy, adrenal fatigue, diabetes, fibromyalgia, Crohn’s disease, heart disease, ulcerative colitis, autism, and even schizophrenia along with many, many more. (more…)

Vitamin C for Chronic and Adrenal Fatigue

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

Many people suffer from chronic fatigue and can’t seem to pinpoint what is causing it. If you’ve been diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome or adrenal fatigue syndrome, then vitamin C can help. Vitamin C deficiency is called scurvy, and it’s not just for pirates. Although severe scurvy is rare in developed countries, you may experience fatigue as the first signs that you’re starting to become deficient in vitamin C.

More severe signs of vitamin C deficiency include bleeding gums or tooth loss, easy bruising, slow healing, frequent illness, and respiratory infections. Feeling fatigued after experiencing mildly stressful situations can be a sign that your adrenal glands have run out of vitamin C.

Humans, unlike almost every other animal on the planet, do not produce their own vitamin C. We must obtain it through supplementation or our diets. Several things can quickly deplete your body of its vitamin C reserves. Smoking, alcohol consumption, stress, inflammation, illness, over-the-counter painkillers, exercise, and birth control pills can quickly drain you of this much needed necessary nutrient.

Vitamin C is vital for producing energy and avoiding fatigue. Fatigue is usually the first symptom you’ll have when your body runs out of carnitine, which is a compound required to transport fat into your cells to produce energy. Vitamin C is used to create and synthesize carnitine. In addition to synthesizing carnitine, it is also responsible for synthesizing the neurotransmitter, norepinephrine, which is critical for brain function. If these two substances become low or depleted, you’ll feel wiped out and fatigued, no matter how much sleep you get.

Adrenal fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome have many of the same symptoms with one exception. With adrenal fatigue, you may have the need to take several naps throughout the day, but then you’ll be awake during the nighttime hours. Vitamin C is more concentrated in the adrenal glands than anywhere else in the body. It is used there to produce all of the adrenal hormones, like cortisol. Cortisol and vitamin C are quickly used up when you experience stress. When your adrenal glands can no longer meet the demands of your stress, you will immediately feel fatigued and exhausted.

When you hit this point of adrenal fatigue, your adrenal glands try to compensate for the lack of vitamin C present by producing as much cortisol as possible. This causes anxiety, high blood pressure, belly fat accumulation, and affects your blood sugar. By replacing vitamin C as you need it, the adrenal glands will help your body to maintain homeostasis by only producing the amount of cortisol and other stress hormones that you need, only when you need them.

Vitamin C supplementation has been proven to help combat fatigue in as little as 2 hours. If you continue a supplementation routine of taking small doses of vitamin C every few hours you may be able to combat your fatigue throughout the day. When you get up to a dosage of vitamin C that doesn’t upset your stomach and makes you feel better, stay there for as long as your body deems it necessary. When you’re feeling better for longer periods of time, titrate your dosage down to a normal daily allowance.

Most people prefer a buffered vitamin C powder because it works quickly and is non-acidic. This type of vitamin C supplement causes less stomach upset than one that contains a lot of acid.

As always, speak with your doctor before starting a vitamins and supplements routine.

About the Author: Stacy A. Pessoney is Wholesale Nutrition’s Chief Editor and Communications Research Director. She has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with the help of vitamins and supplements, focusing on sodium ascorbate in the form of vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

What is Adrenal Fatigue?


http://www.adrenalfatiguerecovery.com/vitamin-c.html
http://www.doctoryourself.com/cheraskin_fatigue.html
http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20120220/entlife/799996021/
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminC/index.html#function

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Understanding Fibromyalgia

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

Fibromyalgia is a complex disorder that causes a host of widespread and debilitating symptoms. It is believed to be a problem with the brain processing pain signals. Misinformation is constantly sent all over the body, causing musculoskeletal pain that is combined with fatigue, anxiety, muscle tension headaches, muscle spasms, gastrointestinal distress, memory problems, mood disorders, depression, fatigue, and sleep problems.

Triggers for fibromyalgia are sometimes unknown, but usually it starts after a period of extreme stress, trauma, surgery, infection, or disease. The onset can be sudden or gradual with symptoms ranging from mild to severely disabling. Post-traumatic stress disorder is often linked to fibromyalgia. Studies show that there may be a genetic link making some families more susceptible to fibromyalgia development.

The pain of fibromyalgia is often described as a dull ache that will not go away. The pain often stems from muscles and “tender points” on the body and is considered widespread because it occurs above and below the waist, as well as on the right and left side of the body. Pain worsens when tender points are pressed. Your doctor will test around 18 tender points. A diagnosis of fibromyalgia may be made if at least 11 tender points produce an abnormal amount of pain. These areas include:

Back of the Head
Area between the Shoulder Blades
Sides of the Neck
Upper Chest Area
Tops of the Shoulders
Sides of Elbows
Sides or Tops of Hip Bones
Inside of the Knees

Sleep problems including restless leg syndrome, sleep apnea, and sleep interrupted by pain are common. Fatigue is often severe enough to be disabling.

While the triggers are sometimes discoverable, the cause of fibromyalgia isn’t completely understood. Research shows that people with fibromyalgia “get stuck” in a heightened state of fight or flight. This makes them very sensitive to pain by keeping the pain receptors overly active. It also allows the body’s muscle and nerve memory cells to continually cause the release of neurotransmitters that tell the brain that pain is present, even in cases where there is no sign of injury or disease.

Many people find relief from their fibromyalgia by drastically reducing stress in their lives. Medications are also commonly necessary and may include pain killers, anti-inflammatory drugs, antidepressants, sleep inducing medications, and anti-seizure drugs that calm help regulate neurotransmitter production.

It can be a long road of trial and error before you and your doctor find a combination of drugs that help you to cope. Lifestyle changes can help to ease symptoms and improve the effectiveness of medicinal therapies. Staying active may be tough, but research shows that those who do often find long-term relief. Doing too much may cause symptoms to worsen, but low impact exercises, such as walking or swimming are generally more tolerable.

Talk with your doctor about incorporating vitamins and supplements that help to control the stress and immune response into your treatment plan. B vitamins and vitamin C are depleted by stress. Since stress is a major contributor to pain in fibromyalgia patients, supplementing with these stress regulating vitamins can help.

If your fibromyalgia is accompanied by gastrointestinal problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome, stomach ulcers, or acid reflux, you will want to be more careful about which vitamins you take. Vitamin C can be very acidic and cause stomach upset. However, buffered vitamin C powder is almost completely non-acidic and much more tolerable for most people. Speak with your doctor about which vitamins and supplements may be right for you.

About the Author: Stacy A. Pessoney is Wholesale Nutrition’s Chief Editor and Communications Research Director. She has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with the help of vitamins and supplements, focusing on sodium ascorbate in the form of vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/fibromyalgia/DS00079/DSECTION=lifestyle-and-home-remedies

New Home Page


http://www.afsafund.org/resource.htm

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Why Do I Need Vitamin C?

Friday, April 27th, 2012

Vitamin C does a lot more than help you to get over or avoid the common cold and flu. It is a potent antioxidant that is critical in helping your body to carry out many of its normal processes. Since vitamin C can only be consumed through diet or vitamins and supplements, it is necessary to consider what you could be doing to your body by failing to get enough.

Vitamin C is responsible for the function and repair of your bones, lungs, circulatory system, joints, immune system, and more. The recommended daily allowance by the government is just enough to keep a perfectly healthy person from developing a deficiency disease, such as scurvy. If you are exposed to any type of pollutant, allergen, chemical, or food additive then your daily requirement to stay healthy increases. Even stress and exercise produce free radicals that lead to oxidative stress, greatly increasing the need for vitamin C.

Free radicals are responsible for creating infection. Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, protects cells, proteins and lipids from free radical damage. It also improves the function and life span of immune cells. This helps the body to defend itself from almost every infectious disease. It also has a dramatic effect on existing infections. An article in Life Extension Magazine reported that “studies of vitamin C supplementation in military personnel and other subjects living in close quarters have shown that pneumonia occurred a remarkable 80-100% less often in subjects taking vitamin C than in those who did not supplement with the vitamin”.

Vitamin C is also responsible for the production of collagen and elastin, which are the major components of connective tissues all over your body. All of your bones, joints, blood vessels and organs are constantly experiencing cell death and renewal. They are in constant need of collagen and elastin to repair themselves. Without enough, we experience unhealthy aging, cancers, high cholesterol, degraded neurotransmitters, improper hormone production, and a long list of inflammatory, degenerative, and infectious diseases.

Vitamin C is needed to properly produce cells, absorb calcium and iron, and prevent diseases such as cataracts, cancer, and heart disease. It also is necessary to regulate blood clotting, which prevents clotting and bleeding disorders.

Ascorbic acid is needed for dental health as well. Your gums are generally the first place that you will notice a difference if you’re not getting enough vitamin C. They are made up almost entirely of connective tissue that is stressed every time you bite down or clench your teeth. You may notice your gums most dramatically turning red, swelling, receding, or bleeding around the teeth that touch first when you gently close your jaw. This is because the gums experience the most stress in these areas. Gums that are inflamed or weak due to a lack of vitamin C are susceptible to gum disease. Gum disease starts as plaque, which recent studies have shown cannot form if proper levels of vitamin C are maintained. Even sailors in the 18th century knew that if their gums started bleeding that they were in danger of scurvy. This is still why many doctors use the health of your gums to determine if you’re on your way to cardiovascular disease, arthritis, lung dysfunction, high blood pressure, stroke, and many other health problems.

Ask your doctor about supplementing with vitamin C. If you have stomach or digestive issues, you can take a buffered form of vitamin C that is non-acidic, like sodium ascorbate vitamin C powder.

Sources:
http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2006/oct2006_report_vitaminc_01.htm
http://altmedicine.about.com/od/healthconditionsdisease/a/gum_disease.htm

Reprinting:
This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Treating Stomach Ulcers with Vitamins

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Most stomach ulcers are caused by a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), but not all. A stomach ulcer is basically an injury in the stomach lining. Stress, smoking, the chronic use of anti-inflammatory medications, and even genetic predisposition can cause an overproduction of stomach acid, which can lead to the formation of an ulcer.

Helicobacter pylori are spiral shaped bacteria that can be transmitted from person to person through food and water. If stomach acid levels are increased, it produces an ideal environment for the H. pylori bacteria to thrive. Duodenal ulcers, or ulcers in the lower part of the stomach and upper part of the intestine, are four times more common in the United States than gastric ulcers or esophageal ulcers, both located higher up in the stomach or esophagus. Duodenal ulcers can cause a constant “hunger” pain which is often relieved with a meal. Other types of ulcers are generally aggravated by a meal and pain occurs often at night when the patient is lying down.

Up to 90% of duodenal ulcers are found to be caused by the H. pylori bacterium. There are several tests that can be performed to check for the bacteria, but many doctors choose to treat stomach ulcers with acid-suppressing medication for one or two months before they consider treating the bacteria. This is especially true if patients are on long-term anti-inflammatory medications because the medications are considered to most likely be the cause. Unfortunately for these patients, ulcers can worsen during the time that the bacteria is allowed to thrive.

H. pylori bacteria can live in the stomach lining, harmlessly, for your entire life. Once infected, a person will not get rid of the bacteria until properly treated. It is only when stress, smoking, alcohol consumption, or some other trigger causes an increase in stomach acid production that the bacteria causes problems. Once inflammation has set in, it disrupts the mucus barrier and H. pylori is allowed to invade. The more acid your stomach produces, the more active the bacteria becomes.

Treatment for H. pylori is often called “triple therapy”. Two types of antibiotics are given to heal the infection caused by the bacteria, along with an acid-suppressing medication, which helps the antibiotics to work and creates a less acceptable environment for the bacteria. This treatment is generally effective for symptoms after a week, but the bacteria may not be gone. Very few doctors will order a test to see if the bacteria is gone, which means that it could still be there, ready to invade again.

You can help to increase the chances of the triple therapy working by taking supportive vitamins and supplements. Vitamin C is an essential nutrient in creating the collagen and elastin needed to repair and maintain the stomach lining. Almost all patients with ulcers are deficient in vitamin C. This is because acidic vitamin C containing foods are generally avoided by people with ulcers and also because the little vitamin C that they do normally consume is quickly used up by the inflammation in the ulcer. Unless adequate amounts of vitamin C are somehow consumed, repairs to the stomach lining cannot take place and damage will continue to occur.

Mineral salts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) are called “mineral ascorbates”. These forms of vitamin C are considerably less acidic and are recommended for patients with gastrointestinal problems. Mineral ascorbates, like sodium ascorbate, are generally found in the form of a vitamin C powder or vitamin C crystals. Talk with your doctor about supplementing along with your stomach ulcer treatment.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

http://www.mindbodyhealth.com/roexepithelial.htm
http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/id/QAA352656
http://www.livestrong.com/article/82221-foods-can-eaten-stomach-ulcer/
http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=45382

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Improving Autoimmune Health

Friday, November 18th, 2011

If you suffer from any autoimmune disease, you are probably interested in prevention more than treatment. This is because autoimmune diseases can affect just about any part of the body and can be displayed in many different forms. You could suffer from several different ailments before being diagnosed with autoimmune dysfunction.

Autoimmune diseases are characterized by one common thing. They all arise from an overactive immune response to some sort of trigger. The body overreacts to small invaders or dysfunctions and attacks full force, even damaging healthy cells. The immune system can even mistake a normal cell for an invader and take it over. This is what makes autoimmune disorders so hard to treat. A lot of times, by the time they are noticed or diagnosed, healthy tissues have already been damaged.

Autoimmune disorders are normally treated with medications that suppress the immune response. These are called immunosuppression drugs. More than eighty different illnesses are classified as autoimmune diseases or are believed to be caused by autoimmunity, putting autoimmune disorder in the top ten list of leading causes of death among women in age groups up to 65 years of age.

Combating autoimmune diseases starts with creating a “good nutritional foundation over a long period of time”. This can greatly reduce the risk of developing diseases triggered by an autoimmune response. Patients with disorders such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis will usually have low serum levels of beta-carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin A.

Treatments involving inflammation reducing vitamins and supplements have been shown to delay or prevent the onset of autoimmune diseases. Antioxidant treatments can be used to treat symptoms of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases through their anti-inflammatory activity. Vitamin C is a great supplement for helping to create long-lasting protection against the effects of autoimmune disorders. Vitamin C helps cells to protect themselves from immune response attacks. It also helps to calm the immune system, making it more selective about what it considers a foreign pathogen.

Many people choose to prevent the diseases that their autoimmune dysfunction can cause, rather than wait for it to attack and damage healthy tissues. Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables along with supplementing with antioxidant vitamins can be a great, natural way to control inflammation and prevent disease. Speak with your doctor about monitoring blood serum levels of certain vitamins to make sure that you are getting enough of each. Daily recommendations can change based on the amount of inflammation in your body. Since people with autoimmune disorders generally carry more inflammation, it is important to monitor vitamin levels.

Ask your doctor which supplements will be best for you. Vitamin C is a great way to control inflammation. It is available in many forms, including sodium ascorbate, which is a more bioavailable form of vitamin C than ascorbic acid. It is generally recommended to patients who need to supplement daily because it is a non-acidic form of vitamin C. People with stomach problems or sensitivities to acids generally are more tolerant of sodium ascorbate than other forms of vitamin C. Working with your doctor will help ensure that you choose the best vitamin C for your heath situation.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

http://www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-017.shtml
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/51913.php

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Getting Vitamin C with Stomach Ulcers

Friday, October 14th, 2011

Most people with stomach ulcers have to avoid certain foods that cause them pain or discomfort. This generally includes spicy foods and foods with a high acid content. Unfortunately, this eliminates many of the fruits and vegetables from the diet that are high in vitamin C. Many people complain that vitamin C supplements, like chewable vitamin C tablets, are too acidic and aggravate their stomach discomforts.

The problem now is that most doctors are recommending a diet high in vitamin C for people with irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease, peptic ulcers, and ulcerative colitis. You can avoid the discomfort of acidic foods and vitamin supplements by using the best vitamin C on the market, vitamin C powder. Vitamin C powder is a buffered form of vitamin C called “sodium ascorbate”. It is easily absorbed and used by the body and is almost completely acid-free.

There are many good reasons why doctors and gastroenterologist recommend higher doses of vitamin C to their patients suffering from gastrointestinal conditions. Most stomach ulcers are caused by a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). In a study done by the Journal of the American College of Nutrition showed that patients with H. pylori infections had low levels of vitamin C. While they couldn’t say if the low levels of vitamin C were caused by the infection or if the infection took hold because of vitamin C deficiencies, other studies have found that vitamin C supplementation may help to prevent or reduce the effects of these infections.

Vitamin C is essential in creating, repairing, and maintaining connective tissues, like the epithelial tissues in the stomach lining. It is a vital part of collagen and elastin production. Collagen and elastin are constantly needed for repairing our cells. Epithelial cells, like in the stomach lining, are constantly breaking down and needing to be rebuilt. Without enough vitamin C in the diet of someone suffering from stomach ulcers, these repairs cannot take place and damage will continue to occur.

Supplementing with sodium ascorbate is a great way to ensure that your stomach lining is healing as quickly as possible. Other benefits include a strengthening of the immune system, reducing your chances of developing more ulcers. Stress has been identified as a trigger for ulcers to develop and using vitamin c powder as a supplement is a great way to regulate the production of stress hormones.

Talk with your doctor about incorporating vitamin C supplements into your treatment plan. A combination of antibiotics and stomach acid inhibitors or neutralizers will likely still be necessary. However, you can shorten your healing time and reduce your chances of recurring infections by adding vitamin C to your treatment plan.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Sources:

http://www.mindbodyhealth.com/roexepithelial.htm
http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/id/QAA352656
http://www.livestrong.com/article/82221-foods-can-eaten-stomach-ulcer/
http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=45382

How Doctors Use (Or Should Use) Vitamin Therapy

Monday, July 18th, 2011

Here at Wholesale Nutrition, we highly value valid research related to vitamins and supplements. We are continually impressed with the reports from Orthomolecular Medicine News Service and would like to share some of their content with you from time to time. We hope you find it as fascinating as we do!

(OMNS October 21, 2010) Numerous letters to the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service come from readers wanting to know exactly how to use nutritional therapy for a specific disease. Since we cannot answer such emails personally, we wanted to provide some highly useful resources for our readers’ benefit.

We suggest that you print these documents out and take them to your doctor.

Multiple Sclerosis
The vitamin-based treatment plan of Frederick Robert Klenner, M.D. is a free download at http://www.townsendletter.com/Klenner/KlennerProtocol_forMS.pdf

Cardiovascular Disease
Vitamin E dosages as written and used by Drs. Evan and Wilfrid Shute are posted at http://www.doctoryourself.com/shute_protocol.html

The doctors specifically treated the following with vitamin E:

Coronary thrombosis
Acute rheumatic fever
Chronic rheumatic heart disease
Angina
Hypertension
Thrombophlebitis and Phlebothrombosis
Thrombocytopaenic Purpura
Diabetes Mellitus
Acute and Chronic Nephritis
Burns
Cancer
Hugh D. Riordan, M.D. and colleagues tell how to employ vitamin C intravenously in a free download from http://www.doctoryourself.com/RiordanIVC.pdf or http://www.riordanclinic.org/research/vitaminc/protocol.shtml

Compare with this original 1986 IV vitamin C protocol by Ewan Cameron, M.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/cameron.html

Instructions on Making an Injectable Vitamin C Solution
Written for physician and hospital use by Robert F. Cathcart III, M.D. http://www.doctoryourself.com/vitciv.html

At http://www.doctoryourself.com/titration.html Dr. Cathcart provides specific dosage ranges for treating these illnesses:

Mild cold
Severe cold
Influenza
Coxsackievirus
Mononucleosis
Viral pneumonia
Hay fever
Asthma
Environmental and food allergy
Burns
Injury
Surgical recovery
Anxiety
Cancer
Ankylosing spondylitis
Reiter’s syndrome
Acute anterior uveitis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Bacterial infections
Infectious hepatitis
Candidiasis
Clinical Guide to the Use of Vitamin C
The full text of this book by Lendon H. Smith, M.D. is posted at http://www.seanet.com/~alexs/ascorbate/198x/smith-lh-clinical_guide_1988.htm

Writes Dr. Smith: “I have used Dr. Klenner’s methods on hundreds of patients. He is right. It helps almost every condition and situation, and my failures were due to inadequate amounts.”

The book discusses, in varying detail, megavitamin treatment of the following illnesses:

Virus Pneumonia
Poliomyelitis
Hepatitis
Herpes Simplex & Zoster
Chicken Pox
Measles
Mumps
Mononucleosis
Diphtheria
Dysentery
Pancreatitis
Scarlet fever
Rheumatic fever
Tuberculosis
Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
Tetanus
Arthritis
High cholesterol
Ruptured intervertebral discs
Corneal ulcers
Diabetes
Glaucoma
Schizophrenia
Burns
Heat stroke
Radiation burns
Surgery
Heavy Metal (including Lead) Poisoning
Other Poisonings
Venomous bites
Allergies
Poison Oak or Ivy
Myasthenia Gravis
Experienced physicians have used massive amounts of vitamin C and other nutrients in treating an astonishing and nearly unbelievable variety of conditions. “Many physicians refuse to employ Vitamin C in the amounts suggested,” writes Dr. Klenner, “simply because it is counter to their fixed ideas of what is reasonable. There is no doubt that physicians are being brainwashed with the current journal advertising. I have never seen a patient that Vitamin C would not benefit.”

Dr. Klenner was board certified in diseases of the chest. The Shutes, in obstetrics. Dr. Cathcart, in orthopedic surgery. Dr. Smith, in pediatrics. Dr. Riordan, in psychiatry. Dr. Cameron, in surgery.

What you will learn from the documents above may be a good start, but it is only a start. We recommend that you read extensively and then discuss these physicians’ experiences with your doctor before making any health decision.

For Further Reading:

A searchable free archive of hundreds of full-text nutrition therapy papers is available at http://orthomolecular.org/library/jom/

Bibliographies of the published writings of orthomolecular doctors are posted at
Robert F. Cathcart, M.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_cathcart.html
Emanuel Cheraskin, M.D., D.M.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_cheraskin.html
Benjamin Feingold, M.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_feingold.html
Max Gerson, M.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/bib_gerson.html
Abram Hoffer, M.D., Ph.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_hoffer.html
Hans Nieper, M.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_nieper.html
William J. McCormick, M.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_mccormick.html
William Kaufman, M.D., Ph.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_kaufman.html
Humphry Osmond, M.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_osmond.html
Linus Pauling, Ph.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_pauling_ortho.html
Carl C. Pfeiffer, M.D., Ph.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_pfeiffer_ed.html
Hugh D. Riordan, M.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_riordan.html
Evan Shute, M.D. and Wilfrid Shute, M.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_shute.html
Lendon H. Smith, M.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_lsmith.html
Roger J. Williams, Ph.D.: http://www.doctoryourself.com/biblio_williams.html

To locate a nutritionally-minded physician: http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v06n09.shtml

Nutritional Medicine is Orthomolecular Medicine

Orthomolecular medicine uses safe, effective nutritional therapy to fight illness. For more information: http://www.orthomolecular.org

The peer-reviewed Orthomolecular Medicine News Service is a non-profit and non-commercial informational resource.

Editorial Review Board:

Ian Brighthope, M.D. (Australia)
Ralph K. Campbell, M.D. (USA)
Carolyn Dean, M.D., N.D. (Canada)
Damien Downing, M.D. (United Kingdom)
Michael Ellis, M.D. (Australia)
Michael Gonzalez, D.Sc., Ph.D. (Puerto Rico)
Steve Hickey, Ph.D. (United Kingdom)
James A. Jackson, Ph.D. (USA)
Bo H. Jonsson, M.D., Ph.D. (Sweden)
Thomas Levy, M.D., J.D. (USA)
Jorge R. Miranda-Massari, Pharm.D. (Puerto Rico)
Erik Paterson, M.D. (Canada)
Gert E. Shuitemaker, Ph.D. (Netherlands)

Andrew W. Saul, Ph.D. (USA), Editor and contact person. Email: [email protected]

To Subscribe at no charge: http://www.orthomolecular.org/subscribe.html