Archive for the ‘Dental Health’ Category

The Clinical Impact of Vitamin C: My Personal Experiences as a Physician

Monday, September 8th, 2014

Vitamin C Research

Actual cases of flu, mono, lyme disease and more treated with intravenous vitamin C.

Commentary by Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD

(OMNS Sept 3, 2014) My ongoing relationship with vitamin C now spans a full 20 years, when I first met Dr. Hal Huggins, a pioneering dentist who opened my eyes to a wide array of clinical approaches to different diseases with hitherto unheard-of clinical results at his clinic in Colorado Springs. I can honestly say that my first visit to his clinic began the most meaningful part of my medical education. Nothing has been the same since. My office where I practiced adult cardiology ended up being shuttered shortly after that first visit. And I have never looked back.
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The Link between Dental Health, Heart Health and Diabetes

Thursday, June 26th, 2014
Oral Health Overall Health

What do your teeth and gums say about your overall health?

The health of your teeth and gums can offer you warning to other health conditions developing or existing in your body. Some oral health problems can affect your entire body. Learning the connections between your teeth, gums, and your body can help you to maintain good overall health and catch problems early, preventing disease and death.
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Vitamin Deficiencies that Cause Pain

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

Vitamins for Pain

Is your pain being caused by simple vitamin deficiencies? Get it straight before you medicate.

Vitamin deficiencies can cause all sorts of pain, health conditions, and neurological problems. Before masking symptoms with medication, you should be aware of which ones could be caused by a simple vitamin deficiency. This is especially true if you consider that many common medications deplete our vitamin stores or hinder the absorption of vitamins that we are eating or taking. We recommend that you have your doctor check for these specific vitamin deficiencies before resorting to medication to treat your pain.
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Feeling Tired and Old? Is Vitamin C Your Miracle Supplement?

Thursday, February 27th, 2014
Sick and tired of being sick and tired?

How Vitamin C Deficiency Is Sucking the Life Out of You.

If you are deficient in vitamin C, you will quickly notice the signs of scurvy setting in. These symptoms are synonymous with what most people consider “feeling old”. First, you’ll be unmotivated to do anything. You’ll be tired, lethargic, and back-and-forth between depressed and anxious or irritable. Next, you will notice receding or spongy gums, bleeding gums, and bleeding from mucous membranes. This is the collagen matrix that holds your teeth securely in place breaking down. If you start getting sores on your thighs and legs, you are in very dangerous territory, as your body is completely breaking down, inside and out. After your teeth fall out, you will become jaundiced, get a fever, and die.
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“The Many Uses of Calcium” Part 2

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012

This is a continuation of “The Many Uses of Calcium” Part 1, where we discussed how our bodies use calcium for building bones, clotting blood, keeping teeth and gums healthy, maintaining cell membranes, and for stress management. Learning how we use calcium will help us to realize why it is important to maintain normal levels of calcium in our bodies.

Sleep: Calcium levels are directly linked to your sleep cycles. Our bodies use a lot of calcium during the deepest levels of sleep, particularly REM sleep. If there is not enough calcium present in your body, then REM sleep cannot happen and you’ll wake up. William Sears, M.D. says, “Calcium helps the brain use the amino acid tryptophan to manufacture the sleep-inducing substance melatonin. This explains why dairy products, which contain both tryptophan and calcium, are one of the top sleep-inducing foods.” Replenishing calcium levels can help many people to get a restful, full night’s sleep.

Heart: Calcium is a necessary part of the heart creating a beat. Calcium creates the beginning of a heart beat and then is sent through calcium channels to other cardiac cells, prompting them to beat. Calcium binds to muscle fibers to trigger the actual contraction of the heart. When calcium levels are too high, it slows down the heart. Current studies are being done to determine if high calcium levels put people at a high risk for heart attack. On the other hand, low calcium levels cause a rapid heartbeat and can damage the heart over time.

Cholesterol: New studies are focused around how calcium can help control cholesterol levels. It is thought that calcium binds to cholesterol in the small intestine, so that it is excreted instead of absorbed.

Muscles: Muscles twitch and cramp if there is an insufficient supply of calcium. Calcium can help to improve neurotransmitter function so that muscles receive the right signals, as well. The right amount of calcium leads to smooth functioning muscles with reduced healing time after exertion.

Energy: Calcium flows into and out of cells at a pace that is just right for cellular function. This signaling is very complex, but if calcium levels are sufficient, it is a smooth functioning system. When there is not enough calcium, the cells can’t produce energy. They’re solution is to consume themselves for energy. This is thought to be a contributing factor in nerve damage, nerve degeneration, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

Skin: Calcium regulates skin cell turnover. It also controls the lipid and melanin content of the skin’s cells. Calcium protects the skin from irritants by stimulating antioxidants to prevent damage to skin cells. Calcium is also thought to prevent premature aging of the skin, thinning of the skin, and protect the skin from various cancers.

About the Author: Stacy A. Pessoney is Wholesale Nutrition’s Chief Editor and Communications Research Director. She has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with the help of vitamins and supplements, focusing on sodium ascorbate in the form of vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

“The Many Uses of Calcium” Part 1

Monday, September 17th, 2012

Your body uses calcium for a wide array of functions. We use calcium for maintaining bones, nerves, muscles, and more. We lose a lot of our calcium through sweat and many people don’t get enough calcium to begin with. Use this list to remind yourself of how important calcium is so that you remember to get plenty in your diet or vitamins and supplements routine.

Bones: Children need lots of calcium to build bones and bone mass. As we age, our bodies use calcium for a variety of other reasons. If calcium runs out, our body will draw what it needs from our bones. Bones are not static, fixed structures in the body. They are constantly breaking down and repairing themselves. We need to maintain high enough calcium levels to repair bones when needed.

Blood Clotting: When you are cut or injured, blood needs to clot to prevent bleeding to death. Platelets in the blood stick together and stop the bleeding. Calcium pairs with vitamin K and the protein fibrinogen to form the platelet clot. Without enough calcium in the blood, clotting cannot happen and dangerous bleeding can occur.

Teeth and Gums: Calcium helps to keep bacteria in our mouths from multiplying. When enough calcium is present in the diet, there is less tooth decay. Sugar is known to damage teeth, partially because sugar causes a rapid loss of calcium. Our teeth and gums will usually show signs of decay before osteoporosis sets in. They are great indicators for determining when you are not getting enough calcium in your diet.

Cells: Cell membranes are stabilized and protected by calcium. Calcium is known for helping to protect organ cells, especially the cells of the liver. When calcium levels are sufficient, cell injury and cell death are avoided, helping the body to fight off infection and disease. Calcium also plays a role in regulating nerve signals sent to cells and is thought to protect cells from an overactive immune system and/or invaders.

Stress Management: When we are startled or stressed, cells pull calcium inside of their membranes. When the stressor is gone, the calcium moves back out and magnesium calms the cell. The ratio of calcium to magnesium is very important for regulating stress. Every time a stressful situation occurs, which is multiple times per day for most people, calcium and magnesium are used up. If there is too much calcium or too much magnesium, that imbalance itself causes a stressor in the body, compounding the problem. If you have problems with stress, talk to your doctor about testing your blood to make sure that you are not deficient in calcium or magnesium.

About the Author: Stacy A. Pessoney is Wholesale Nutrition’s Chief Editor and Communications Research Director. She has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with the help of vitamins and supplements, focusing on sodium ascorbate in the form of vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

VITAMIN C AND ACIDITY What Form is Best?

Thursday, August 30th, 2012

Here at Wholesale Nutrition, we highly value valid research related to vitamins and supplements. We are continually impressed with the reports from Orthomolecular Medicine News Service and would like to share some of their content with you from time to time. We hope you find it as fascinating as we do!

Read the article below or click on the following link: Vitamin C and Acidity, Orthomolecular

VITAMIN C AND ACIDITY
What Form is Best?

(OMNS, December 8, 2009) Vitamin C is commonly taken in large quantities to improve health and prevent asthma, allergies, viral infection, and heart disease [1,2]. It is non-toxic and non-immunogenic, and does not irritate the stomach as drugs like aspirin can. Yet vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) is acidic. So, a common question is, what are the effects from taking large quantities?

Ascorbic acid is a weak acid (pKa= 4.2) [3], only slightly stronger than vinegar. When dissolved in water, vitamin C is sour but less so than citric acid found in lemons and limes. Can large quantities of a weak acid such as ascorbate cause problems in the body? The answer is, sometimes, in some situations. However, with some simple precautions they can be avoided.

Acid in the Mouth
First of all, any acid can etch the surfaces of your teeth. This is the reason the dentist cleans your teeth and warns about plaque, for acid generated by bacteria in the mouth can etch your teeth to cause cavities. Cola soft drinks contain phosphoric acid, actually used by dentists to etch teeth before tooth sealants are applied. Like soft drinks, ascorbic acid will not cause etching of teeth if only briefly present. Often, vitamin C tablets are coated with a tableting ingredient such as magnesium stearate which prevents the ascorbate from dissolving immediately. Swallowing a vitamin C tablet without chewing it prevents its acid from harming tooth enamel.

Chewable Vitamin C Tablets
Chewables are popular because they taste sweet and so are good for encouraging children to take their vitamin C [4]. However, some chewable vitamin C tablets can contain sugar and ascorbic acid which, when chewed, is likely to stick in the crevices of your teeth. So, after chewing a vitamin C tablet, a good bit of advice is to rinse with water or brush your teeth. But the best way is to specifically select non-acidic vitamin C chewables, readily available in stores. Read the label to verify that the chewable is made entirely with non-acidic vitamin C.

Stomach Acidity
People with sensitive stomachs may report discomfort when large doses of vitamin C are taken at levels to prevent an acute viral infection (1,000-3,000 milligrams or more every 20 minutes) [1, 5]. In this case the ascorbic acid in the stomach can build up enough acidity to cause heartburn or a similar reaction. On the other hand, many people report no problems with acidity even when taking 20,000 mg in an hour. The acid normally present in the stomach, hydrochloric acid (HCl), is very strong: dozens of times more acidic than vitamin C. When one has swallowed a huge amount of ascorbate, the digestive tract is sucking it up into the bloodstream as fast as it can, but it may still take a while to do so. Some people report that they seem to sense ascorbic acid tablets “sitting” at the bottom of the stomach as they take time to dissolve. It is fairly easy to fix the problem by using buffered ascorbate, or taking ascorbic acid with food or liquids in a meal or snack. When the amount of vitamin C ingested is more than the gut can absorb, the ascorbate attracts water into the intestines creating a laxative effect. This saturation intake is called bowel tolerance. One should reduce the amount (by 20-50%) when this occurs [1].

Acid Balance in the Body
Does taking large quantities of an acid, even a weak acid like ascorbate, tip the body’s acid balance (pH) causing health problems? No, because the body actively and constantly controls the pH of the bloodstream. The kidneys regulate the acid in the body over a long time period, hours to days, by selectively excreting either acid or basic components in urine. Over a shorter time period, minutes to hours, if the blood is too acid, the autonomic nervous system increases the rate of breathing, thereby removing more carbon dioxide from the blood, reducing its acidity. Some foods can indirectly cause acidity. For example, when more protein is eaten than necessary for maintenance and growth, it is metabolized into acid, which must be removed by the kidneys, generally as uric acid. In this case, calcium and/or magnesium are excreted along with the acid in the urine which can deplete our supplies of calcium and magnesium [6]. However, because ascorbic acid is a weak acid, we can tolerate a lot before it will much affect the body’s acidity. Although there have been allegations about vitamin C supposedly causing kidney stones, there is no evidence for this, and its acidity and diuretic tendency actually tends to reduce kidney stones in most people who are prone to them [1,7]. Ascorbic acid dissolves calcium phosphate stones and dissolves struvite stones. Additionally, while vitamin C does increase oxalate excretion, vitamin C simultaneously inhibits the union of calcium and oxalate. [1,2].

Forms of Vitamin C
Ascorbate comes in many forms, each with a particular advantage. Ascorbic acid is the least expensive and can be purchased as tablets, timed release tablets, or powder. The larger tablets (1000-1500 mg) are convenient and relatively inexpensive. Timed-release tablets contain a long-chain carbohydrate which delays the stomach in dissolving the ascorbate, which is then released over a period of hours. This may have an advantage for maintaining a high level in the bloodstream. Ascorbic acid powder or crystals can be purchased in bulk relatively inexpensively. Pure powder is more quickly dissolved than tablets and therefore can be absorbed somewhat faster by the body. Linus Pauling favored taking pure ascorbic acid, as it is entirely free of tableting excipients.

Buffered Ascorbate
A fraction of a teaspoon of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) has long been used as a safe and effective antacid which immediately lowers stomach acidity. When sodium bicarbonate is added to ascorbic acid, the bicarbonate fizzes (emitting carbon dioxide) which then releases the sodium to neutralize the acidity of the ascorbate.

Calcium ascorbate can be purchased as a powder and readily dissolves in water or juice. In this buffered form ascorbate is completely safe for the mouth and sensitive stomach and can be applied directly to the gums to help heal infections [8]. It is a little more expensive than the equivalent ascorbic acid and bicarbonate but more convenient. Calcium ascorbate has the advantage of being non-acidic. It has a slightly metallic taste and is astringent but not sour like ascorbic acid. 1000 mg of calcium ascorbate contains about 110 mg of calcium.

Other forms of buffered ascorbate include sodium ascorbate and magnesium ascorbate [9]. Most adults need 800 – 1200 mg of calcium and 400-600 mg of magnesium daily [6]. The label on the bottle of all these buffered ascorbates details how much “elemental” mineral is contained in a teaspoonful. They cost a little more than ascorbic acid.

Buffered forms of ascorbate are often better tolerated at higher doses than ascorbic acid, but they appear not to be as effective for preventing the acute symptoms of a cold. This may be because after they are absorbed they require absorbing an electron from the body to become effective as native ascorbate [1]. Some of types of vitamin C are proprietary formulas that claim benefits over standard vitamin C [9].

Liposomal Vitamin C
Recently a revolutionary form of ascorbate has become available. This form of vitamin C is packaged inside nano-scale phospholipid spheres (“liposomes”), much like a cell membrane protects its contents. The lipid spheres protect the vitamin C from degradation by the environment and are absorbed more quickly into the bloodstream. Liposomes are also known to facilitate intracellular uptake of their contents, which can cause an added clinical impact when delivering something such as vitamin C. This form is supposed to be 5-10 fold more absorbable than straight ascorbic acid. It is more expensive than ascorbic acid tablets or powder.

Ascorbyl Palmitate
Ascorbyl palmitate is composed of an ascorbate molecule bound to a palmitic acid molecule. It is amphipathic, meaning that it can dissolve in either water or fat, like the fatty acids in cell membranes. It is widely used as an antioxidant in processed foods, and used in topical creams where it is thought to be more stable than vitamin C. However, when ingested, the ascorbate component of ascorbyl palmitate is thought to be decomposed into the ascorbate and palmitic acid molecules so its special amphipathic quality is lost. It is also more expensive than ascorbic acid.

Natural Ascorbate
Natural forms of ascorbate derived from plants are available. Acerola, the “Barbados cherry,” contains a large amount of vitamin C, depending on its ripeness, and was traditionally used to fight off colds. Tablets of vitamin C purified from acerola or rose hips are available but are generally low-dose and considerably more expensive than ascorbic acid. Although some people strongly advocate this type, Pauling and many others have stated that such naturally-derived vitamin C is no better than pure commercial ascorbate [2,9]. Bioflavonoids are antioxidants found in citrus fruits or rose hips and are thought to improve uptake and utilization of vitamin C. Generally, supplement tablets that contain bioflavonoids do not have enough to make much difference. For consumers on a budget, the best policy may be to buy vitamin C inexpensively whether or not it also contains bioflavonoids. Citrus fruits, peppers, and a number of other fruits and vegetables contain large quantities of bioflavinoids. This is one more reason to eat right as well as supplement.

References:

[1] Hickey S, Saul AW (2008) Vitamin C: The Real Story, the Remarkable and Controversial Healing Factor. ISBN-13: 9781591202233

[2] Pauling L (1986) How to Live Longer and Feel Better, by Linus Pauling (Revised version, 2006) ISBN-13: 9780870710964

[3] Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (2004), CRC Press, ISBN-13: 978-0849304859

[4] http://www.doctoryourself.com/megakid.html (Ideas on how to get children to take vitamin C.)

[5] Cathcart RF (1981) Vitamin C, titrating to bowel tolerance, anascorbemia, and acute induced scurvy. Med Hypotheses. 7:1359-1376.

[6] Dean C (2006) The Magnesium Miracle. (2006) ISBN-13: 9780345494580

[7] http://www.doctoryourself.com/kidney.html

[8] http://www.doctoryourself.com/gums.html (Healing gums with buffered ascorbate.)
See also: Riordan HD, Jackson, JA (1991) Topical ascorbate stops prolonged bleeding from tooth extraction. J Orthomolecular Med, 6:3-4, p 202. http://www.orthomolecular.org/library/jom/1991/pdf/1991-v06n03&04-p202.pdf or http://www.doctoryourself.com/news/v3n18.txt

[9] http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminC/vitCform.html (Information about different forms of vitamin C)

[10] http://www.doctoryourself.com/bioflavinoids.html

Nutritional Medicine is Orthomolecular Medicine

Orthomolecular medicine uses safe, effective nutritional therapy to fight illness. For more information: http://www.orthomolecular.org

The peer-reviewed Orthomolecular Medicine News Service is a non-profit and non-commercial informational resource.

Editorial Review Board:

Carolyn Dean, M.D., N.D.
Damien Downing, M.D.
Michael Gonzalez, D.Sc., Ph.D.
Steve Hickey, Ph.D.
James A. Jackson, PhD
Bo H. Jonsson, MD, Ph.D
Thomas Levy, M.D., J.D.
Jorge R. Miranda-Massari, Pharm.D.
Erik Paterson, M.D.
Gert E. Shuitemaker, Ph.D.

Andrew W. Saul, Ph.D., Editor and contact person. Email: [email protected]

Vitamin C for Chronic and Adrenal Fatigue

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

Many people suffer from chronic fatigue and can’t seem to pinpoint what is causing it. If you’ve been diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome or adrenal fatigue syndrome, then vitamin C can help. Vitamin C deficiency is called scurvy, and it’s not just for pirates. Although severe scurvy is rare in developed countries, you may experience fatigue as the first signs that you’re starting to become deficient in vitamin C.

More severe signs of vitamin C deficiency include bleeding gums or tooth loss, easy bruising, slow healing, frequent illness, and respiratory infections. Feeling fatigued after experiencing mildly stressful situations can be a sign that your adrenal glands have run out of vitamin C.

Humans, unlike almost every other animal on the planet, do not produce their own vitamin C. We must obtain it through supplementation or our diets. Several things can quickly deplete your body of its vitamin C reserves. Smoking, alcohol consumption, stress, inflammation, illness, over-the-counter painkillers, exercise, and birth control pills can quickly drain you of this much needed necessary nutrient.

Vitamin C is vital for producing energy and avoiding fatigue. Fatigue is usually the first symptom you’ll have when your body runs out of carnitine, which is a compound required to transport fat into your cells to produce energy. Vitamin C is used to create and synthesize carnitine. In addition to synthesizing carnitine, it is also responsible for synthesizing the neurotransmitter, norepinephrine, which is critical for brain function. If these two substances become low or depleted, you’ll feel wiped out and fatigued, no matter how much sleep you get.

Adrenal fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome have many of the same symptoms with one exception. With adrenal fatigue, you may have the need to take several naps throughout the day, but then you’ll be awake during the nighttime hours. Vitamin C is more concentrated in the adrenal glands than anywhere else in the body. It is used there to produce all of the adrenal hormones, like cortisol. Cortisol and vitamin C are quickly used up when you experience stress. When your adrenal glands can no longer meet the demands of your stress, you will immediately feel fatigued and exhausted.

When you hit this point of adrenal fatigue, your adrenal glands try to compensate for the lack of vitamin C present by producing as much cortisol as possible. This causes anxiety, high blood pressure, belly fat accumulation, and affects your blood sugar. By replacing vitamin C as you need it, the adrenal glands will help your body to maintain homeostasis by only producing the amount of cortisol and other stress hormones that you need, only when you need them.

Vitamin C supplementation has been proven to help combat fatigue in as little as 2 hours. If you continue a supplementation routine of taking small doses of vitamin C every few hours you may be able to combat your fatigue throughout the day. When you get up to a dosage of vitamin C that doesn’t upset your stomach and makes you feel better, stay there for as long as your body deems it necessary. When you’re feeling better for longer periods of time, titrate your dosage down to a normal daily allowance.

Most people prefer a buffered vitamin C powder because it works quickly and is non-acidic. This type of vitamin C supplement causes less stomach upset than one that contains a lot of acid.

As always, speak with your doctor before starting a vitamins and supplements routine.

About the Author: Stacy A. Pessoney is Wholesale Nutrition’s Chief Editor and Communications Research Director. She has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with the help of vitamins and supplements, focusing on sodium ascorbate in the form of vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

What is Adrenal Fatigue?


http://www.adrenalfatiguerecovery.com/vitamin-c.html
http://www.doctoryourself.com/cheraskin_fatigue.html
http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20120220/entlife/799996021/
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminC/index.html#function

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Vitamin C Prevents and Cures Heat Exhaustion

Friday, June 29th, 2012

Do you feel like the heat just drains you of energy? Do other people seem fine at a heat level that is intolerable to you? It could be your vitamin and mineral levels. Vitamin C, magnesium, zinc, calcium, sodium, potassium, and of course water need to be replaced after being exposed to the heat.

People with diabetes, people over 40, people who urinate frequently, and people with hyperhidrosis (a condition where a person has more sweat glands than are necessary and sweating is excessive) need to replenish B vitamins, vitamin C, and minerals lost through sweating at almost double the rate of other people. We start losing our sense of thirst after about age 40 and it’s common for elderly people to barely be able to sense thirst at all. This puts them at a much higher risk for heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Every time you sweat, you lose the vitamins and electrolytes that give your muscles the energy that they need to work. If you are low in any of these nutrients, you will automatically feel sleepy and fatigued when you are exposed to the heat. Replacing these vitamins and minerals is essential to recovery from the heat.

Studies have shown that people suffering from heat exhaustion and heat stroke are almost always deficient in vitamin C as well as other water soluble vitamins, like B vitamins. The body requires double the amount of water in hot weather than it does in cooler weather. It flushes out water soluble vitamins with sweat. This has a lot of ramifications on your health, energy, mental state, and immune system.

There are a lot of side effects that you’ll notice if you’re running low on water soluble vitamins or minerals that are lost when you sweat. Hot flashes, anemia (insufficient iron), fatigue, loss of appetite, depression, abdominal discomfort, respiratory infections, hair loss, muscle cramps, gum disease, dry skin and dry hair are most common. Because the nervous system requires so much fluid, B vitamins, electrolytes, and vitamin C to function, many people will experience headaches, migraines, nerve pain, and neurological disturbances, including hallucinations, confusion, and even seizures.

Drinking sports drinks can help you to replace electrolytes, but many people are sensitive to the artificial sweeteners or sugar in them. A good alternative is to supplement with the best vitamin C, a non-acidic buffered vitmain C powder that contains calcium, magnesium, zinc and potassium. Supplementing with a B vitamin complex is also advisable under a doctor’s supervision. Drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, whether you feel thirsty or not to guard against dehydration.

Supplementing and being diligent about hydration can help you to tolerate higher temperatures for longer periods of time. Not only will you be more comfortable, you’ll feel better and avoid the dangers of heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

About the Author: Stacy A. Pessoney is Wholesale Nutrition’s Chief Editor and Communications Research Director. She has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with the help of vitamins and supplements, focusing on sodium ascorbate in the form of vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.

Sources:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/458415-vitamin-deficiency-caused-by-excessive-sweating/
http://www.earthclinic.com/CURES/heat_exhaustion.html
http://www.livestrong.com/article/268689-vitamins-for-heat-exhaustion/
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002350.htm

Profuse Sweating


http://www.medicinenet.com/heat_stroke/article.htm

Vitamin News: Vitamin D Does Not Take the Place of UVB Exposure

Saturday, May 5th, 2012

There are five different forms of vitamin D, two of which are important to humans. There are major differences in the two, vitamin D2 and vitamin D3, which you may or may not be aware of. Taking the wrong one can be more detrimental than beneficial to your health. If your milk, calcium supplement, or standard vitamin D supplement simply says “vitamin D”, then you may want to take a look at the label.

A staggering number of Americans are considered clinically vitamin D deficient while an astounding number are considered to be in the insufficient range. This includes children who are exposed to sunlight and drink milk and/or orange juice with added vitamin D almost every day. Even a lot of adults that regularly take a daily vitamin D supplement are deficient.

How can this be? Without a blood test from your doctor, you may be putting your health at a major risk, all while thinking that you are being diligent about your vitamin D intake. Supplemental vitamin D comes in two different forms; ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3).

The synthetic form of vitamin D2, comes from passing plant matter and fungus through a radiation treatment. This is the vitamin D typically added to orange juice, milk, and vitamin D supplements. Vitamin D2 can be obtained from plant sources.

Vitamin D3 can be obtained (in small amounts) from animal sources, such as egg yolks and non-pasteurized full-fat milk. While both vitamin D2 and D3 must be converted by the body into active forms, vitamin D3 is converted 500% faster than D2 according to a report by the Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism. They also report that vitamin D3 is 87% more potent in raising and maintaining vitamin D concentrations and produces 2-3 fold greater storage of vitamin D.

Once your sources of vitamin D are converted into their active forms, sunlight is necessary to transform them into cholesterol sulfate. This means that, contrary to prior medical beliefs, supplementing with vitamin D does not completely replace the need for sun exposure. In fact, recent studies on the importance of cholesterol sulfate show that without sufficient UVB sun exposure, about 30 minutes per week, the body compensates by producing LDL, or “bad” cholesterol.

Doctors and researchers are now linking heart disease, high cholesterol, arterial plaque, cancer, autism, hypertension, obesity, arthritis, Crohn’s disease, dementia, seizures, asthma, migraines, depression, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, and both types of diabetes to a lack of vitamin D3 in the diet and inadequate UVB exposure.

This may sound overwhelming, but when you consider that the proposed 30 minutes of UVB sunlight exposure per week requirement must happen when the UV index is above 3, then you may start to realize why diseases such as these, increase in prevalence as you move away from the equator. Most of the United States only experiences this level of sunlight intensity for about 1-2 months of the year.

These diseases and more are being linked to inadequate vitamin D levels because vitamin D is responsible for an astounding number or processes in the body. It is a neuroregulatory steroidal hormone that influences almost 3,000 different genes and has receptors in nearly every cell of your body. It produces over 200 antimicrobial peptides, including broad-spectrum antibiotics, regulates the immune system and controls chronic inflammation.

Many doctors now recommend “safe” tanning bed use for obtaining adequate vitamin D3 levels. UVA rays are harmful, but beds that only produce UVB rays can be very effective forms of treatment.

About the Author: Phil Le Breton is owner at Wholesale Nutrition. He has a strong interest in helping people achieve greater brain and body health with vitamins and supplements, with an emphasis on vitamin C powder. Wholesale Nutrition has provided the world with the best vitamin C and wholesale vitamins since 1970. Visit http://www.nutri.com to buy high-quality discount vitamins today!

Sources:

http://www.jlr.org/content/44/7/1268.abstract
http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/96/3/E447.abstract
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/02/23/oral-vitamin-d-mistake.aspx
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/161618.php

Reprinting:

This entire article may be reprinted free of charge provided that the “About the Author” section of the article, sources, and all links in the article are included. For shorter quotations, a clear link to the blog post or Wholesale Nutrition is sufficient.